SoJourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman?

Ain’t I a Woman? Sojourner Truth May 28-29, 1851

Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think
that ‘twixt the negroes of the South and the women of the North, all talking about rights, the
white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what’s all this here talking about?
That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages and lifted over
ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or
over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain’t I a woman? Look at me! Look at
my arm! I could have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could
head me! And ain’t I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man- when I
could get it- and bear the lash as well! And ain’t I a woman? I have borne thirteen children,
and seen them most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother’s grief,
none but Jesus heard me! And ain’t I a woman?
Then they talk about this thing in the head; what’s this they call it? [Intellect, somebody
whispers] That’s it, honey. What’s that got to do with women’s rights or negro’s rights? If
my cup won’t hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn’t you be mean not to let me
have my little half measure-full?
Then that little man in black there, he says women can’t have as much rights as men,
’cause Christ wasn’t a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ
come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.
If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all
alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again!
And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.
Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain’t got nothing more to say.

 Americans felt  slaves were men and women were white,  leaving  Black Women genderless–sounds familiar?    Sojourner’s speech encapsulated the sentiment that:  White women were not the only women, Black Women were WOMEN also.   One can imagine how many whites cared including  white feminists who duped  Black Women into supporting  white women’s rights.  In the end, they joined their men in oppressing black women and men.

sojourner_truth_michelle_obama_pelosi_SoJourner truth bust unveiled

More Quotes by Truth

There is a great stir about colored men getting their rights, but not a word about the colored women; and if colored men get their rights, and not colored women theirs, you see the colored men will be masters over the women, and it will be just as bad as it was before. So I am for keeping the thing going while things are stirring; because if we wait till it is still, it will take a great while to get it going again. ~ Sojourner Truth, Equal Rights Convention #Quote #Sojourner Truth

It is the mind that makes the body. ~Sojourner Truth #Quote

Religion without humanity is very poor human stuff. ~Sojourner Truth #Quote

http://africanamericanquotes.org/about.html

http://www.pbs.org/thisfarbyfaith/people/sojourner_truth.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ain%27t_I_a_Woman

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/s/sojourner_truth.html

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

4 thoughts on “SoJourner Truth: Ain’t I a Woman?”

  1. s not simply an “acne relief” or ” skin-care program”.
    You can rub a little portion of garlic on your acne, more than once in a
    day. That was until a friend told me about the extremely simple program he used
    to quickly clear up his skin.

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  2. If I wrote well and had more time , I would re-write the history books to include FACTS WITH EVIDENCE and not TRASH about the master culture that forms the foundation of our educational system which SUCKS!

    Like

  3. Black people need to develop a system of communication so we can organize for ACTION. Should I organize this system? Not sure if black people know what discrimination is anymore based on my experience at HSPH.

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  4. Appears Black Women were feminist long before the idea came to white women. History has never been kind to black people, erasing our past, and giving our glories to whites. Sounds like Harvard School of Public Health. I will never TRUST another history book.

    It is hard to find great quotes by acclaimed black leaders, why? I think we, blacks, have forgotten how to do things ourselves. We are relying on the same folks who stole our history to preserve it. Insanity and that was the beginning of Negro History week in 1926, started by Carter Woodson , a brilliant historian. The second week in February was chosen to honor the birthdays of two great leaders: Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln. More later about Black History Month….

    Liked by 1 person

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