Choose to Fight For Justice and Equality Over Reparation

Malcolm-X-_Black-Man-the-truth

Choose Justice and Equality Over Reparation:  Is it Time To Change the conversation around Black people?

If peace means accepting second class citizenship, then I don’t want it. If peace means keeping my mouth shut in the midst of evil and injustice, then I don’t want it. If peace means being complacent and accepting the status quo, then I don’t want it. If peace means being passive, then I don’t want it. If peace means a willingness to be exploited and humiliated, then that’s the kind of peace that I don’t want—-DR. KING (from his speech in Louisville Kentucky , 1956)

The Past Isn’t Past: The Economic Case for Reparationz

Nice Article!

This article makes Interesting  and unique points,  many I agree with  wholeheartedly,  especially the importance of  intergenerational financial and emotional supports.  Both are lacking  in black communities.  Fortunately,  the latter requires no money.  But  I disagree with experts.

We should not expect anything except to fight for equality and justice. We need community metrics to measure those outcomes and others.

We need the expertise of our experts   to educate, mentor or sponsor blacks within black communities.   Many successful blacks in positions of influence do not use their influence to help the masses of blacks or those blacks outside their social (inner circle) class and that is a pity. These experts  are  often called upon to be the voices of blacks, please be MEANINGFUL  voices of productivity  for our people.

Blacks have no foundation for sustained success  in helping  other blacks up the ladder– unlike other  successful culture  that planted and built  foundations of success along the way.    In other words,  create infrastructures to help other blacks instead of relying on other cultures or making racism   a scapegoat and crutch.   If I grew up thinking every weird look or negative response from whites was due to racism I would not have completed college.  Those thoughts are self-defeating.

I used to be embarrassed by Rev Al Sharpton. Today, I respect him more than many other black leaders. Whites labelled him because he brought race, discrimination and bigotry to the dinner table.  In retrospect,  it took guts.  And I  thank him for his contributions and support of poor black folks.  He spread awareness…we need to move on…change the discussion to self-efficacy.

Finally, based on my experience, many blacks feel entitled to reparations or  focus on blame rather than self-improvement. Everything is a gift. I  tire of excuses ….whining without action is not productive but rather destructive and a waste of time.  Excuses layered on top of underlying self-doubt, negativity and mistrust of the world. The latter three is where we as blacks need to start as a community.

Blacks need to feel safe,  to feel a sense of well-being and self-efficacy.  Self-Efficacy will only come with equality, justice, health and access.

Those of us who are blazing the way to enlighten our people everywhere, are at times very much annoyed and discouraged by acts of our own people. They do so many things to hurt our feelings of loyalty, and love for the race, but what can we do? Can we forsake them because they hurt our feelings, surely not. Painful though it may be, we must be sympathetic and we must be forgiving. So when that ignorant fellow who happens to be a member of our race, stands up to block some cause that will benefit our people, you will be able to overlook him—–MARCUS GARVEY (from the Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey)

If only those great leaders were here today….

 

Source of Quotes: FAMOUS QUOTES 

To  article  :The Past Isn’t Past: The Economic Case for Reparationz

Moorbey'z Blog


Hundreds of years of slavery and the American-style apartheid known as Jim Crow continue to hurt the economic prospects of African-American babies born today.

“The past is in the past; it’s time to move on.”

That’s a common response to Ta-Nehisi Coates’ eloquent essay in The Atlantic, “The Case for Reparations,” and his recent discussion with Bill Moyers.

But that sentiment betrays a fundamental lack of understanding of how the legacy of hundreds of years of slavery and the American-style apartheid known as Jim Crow continue to hurt the economic prospects of African-American babies born today.

“The average black family has about one-tenth of the wealth of the typical white family — that’s ten cents on the dollar,” says NYU sociologist Dalton Conley, author of Being Black, Living in the Red: Race, Wealth and Social Class in…

View original post 2,075 more words

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

5 thoughts on “Choose to Fight For Justice and Equality Over Reparation”

  1. I liked the concept of “ALL people would have a chance to once in their life have some fun, and not only a few privileged ones” However, I do not think doling out $50,000 would accomplish that…in this country homicide rate of kids at age 18 would increase. …Yes people are that greedy even some parents.

    Resource based economy in America is exploiting taxpayers money. The key to understanding our systems is to follow the money trail–the motivation and incentive.

    Why do we think poor people want hand outs? I now recognize it is a ploy. There are many social programs, but what percent of the budget goes toward social programs and poor neighborhoods. I do not trust the integrity of our studies (especially those at Harvard) to provide accurate data because of conflicts of interest.

    Subsidies are back doors into our pockets….and never subsidize those who need the most help. Subsidies are another form of expense accounts for our politicians and big businesses-

    Like

  2. “………whether America has truly moved beyond its racist past” That’s a silly question, because America has most definitely NOT!

    Close the poverty gap? Lmao. That’s even more difficult than closing the gender gap. Even the most progressive countries in that area on the planet still didn’t come closer than 80%! The USA? Overall world ranking (2013 WEF) #23.

    No government, no system, and no law will ever be able to erase discrimination, racism, poverty, or war. Only when individual values change and human stupidity makes place for some kind of rudimentary wisdom, there’s a chance for this to happen.

    Opening a bank account for every kid is a good idea. I even proposed once to give every 18 year old US$ 50,000, = to do with it whatever he/she pleases. It’s an easy way to find out who the entrepreneurs are and who are not. But at least ALL people would have a chance to once in their life have some fun, and not only a few privileged ones.

    Be all this as it may, as long as money is idol, the future of humanity is grim. Remember I once, as a possible alternative, hinted to what Mr. Fresco coined as a resource based economy? The last time I brought that up during a meeting with employees of a world renowned company, I was laughed at. Yeah boxed in common sense is hard to beat, hehe.

    Liked by 1 person

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