Zika Virus Targets The Fetus

The virus known as Zika was first isolated shortly after World War II, in 1947 Uganda. The first human case was reported in Nigeria in 1954.

Since, the virus spread across Africa and into the Pacific. It was detected in Malaysia in 1966. In 2007 the virus spread to the Island of Yap in Micronesia, with the first reported outbreak:  73% of the population aged 3 and above being infected.

In 2009, after a field trip to Senegal in Africa, American scientist Brian Foy may have transmitted the infection to his wife (the first known suspected case of sexually transmitted Zika).

In 2013 French Polynesia there were 28,000 infections in one outbreak. In 2015 the first reported local transmissions of the virus were seen in South America, Central America and the Caribbean.  Presently, there are reports of 3 cases involving New Yorkers.

Since 2015 there has been a Zika outbreak in Brazil. It is believed the virus was spread during the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Now there is serious concern with the pending Rio 2016 Olympic Games! The American CDC authority estimates there were 1.3 million suspected cases in Brazil in 2015.

Transmission Methods

The primary mode of transmission is from mosquitoes, the Aedes aegypti, to humans. These are the same insects known to transmit other viral infections such as Dengue Fever, Yellow Fever and West Nile Virus.   With many infected, concerns of humans transmitting the  Zika virus to local mosquitoes is mounting.

Several reports of secondary transmission, from human males, via sexually transmitted infections opens the possibility of Zika becoming a sexually transmitted virus.   In affected areas in Brazil, a 20-30 fold surge in babies born with microcephaly is  linked to Zika virus.   The virus isolated in amniotic fluid, breast milk and semen, raised concerns that it could be transmitted by blood transfusions, laboratory exposure, sex and intrauterine (uterus), prompting  more investigation into its mode of transmission.

Symptoms

Zeka has an incubation period of about 10 days. Travelers returning from infected areas may develop the infection after an incubation period of about 10 days.

Symptoms  are usually none at all in 80% of those infected or at most a very mild headache, fever, maculopapular rash, conjunctivitis and joint pains. Symptoms are self-limited and there are presently no antibiotic or antiviral treatments available.

Infection in the first trimester of pregnancy is linked to microcephaly (tiny heads) and other brain damage in newborns.

Brazil:
In 2013 there were 167 cases of microcephaly; in 2014 there were 147 cases; and in 2015 there were  at least 2,782 cases.

RNA (an acid) from the Zika virus was isolated in mothers and babies with microcephaly. In addition, some patients have developed Guillain-Barre Syndrome (muscle weakness), which caused transient paralysis following infection.

Prevention


Protection from mosquitoes is the best prevention.   Use mosquito repellent and cover up exposed skin. These mosquitoes bite during the daytime. There are no vaccines available.

Currently the CDC-issued travel guidance advises pregnant women not to travel to affected countries.  Some South American and Caribbean countries advised women to postpone pregnancy until 2018. 

Healthcare providers should report Zeka cases to their state or local health departments.

Why now?

There are reports of genetically-modified mosquitoes being used in Brazil to reduce the mosquito population. Such produces deformed mosquitoes. These may be eaten by birds, other insects and humans. The long-term effect unknown.

Imagine the weaponry of GMO mosquitos.  Zika???  It targets our future generation and may reduce birth rates in affected countries.


 

Links to referenced material below…

http://microbepost.org/2016/01/13/what-is-zika-virus/

Zika Virus Spreads to New Areas — Region of the Americas, May 2015–January 2016 | MMWR
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6503e1er.htm?s_cid=mm6503e1er.htm_w

Zika virus: Outbreak ‘likely to spread across Americas’ says WHO – BBC News

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-35399403

Brazilian City Tries Fighting Viruses With GMO Mosquitoes
http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/gmo-mosquitoes-may-battle-zika-dengue-brazil-n499576

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

1 thought on “Zika Virus Targets The Fetus”

  1. Brazil again, didn’t the killer Bees come out of Brazil also? Another modified insect, Africanized Honey Bees? There is no fool proof method of repelling skeeters other than moving to a cold climate where they can’t survive! OK, you could try a space suit.

    Liked by 1 person

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