Violent Crime Stats Declining Since 1990’s

Violent Crimes Declining Since 1994

U.S. Department of Justice

Of ce of Justice Programs

Bureau of Justice Statistics

Revised 9/19/2014

Criminal Victimization, 2013

Jennifer L. Truman, Ph.D., and Lynn Langton, Ph.D., BJS Statisticians

In 2013, U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced an estimated 6.1 million violent victimizations and 16.8 million property victimizations, according to

the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ (BJS) National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). After two consecutive years of increases, the overall violent crime rate (which includes rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault) declined slightly, from 26.1 victimizations per 1,000 persons in 2012 to 23.2 per 1,000 in 2013 (figure 1). The slight decline in simple assault accounted for about 80% of the change in total violence.The  rate of violent crime in 2013 was similar to the rate in 2011 (22.6 per 1,000). Since 1993, the rate of violent crime has declined from 79.8 to 23.2 victimizations per 1,000 persons age 12 or older.

The overall property crime rate (which includes household burglary, the , and motor vehicle the ) decreased from 155.8 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 131.4 victimizations per 1,000 in 2013. e decline in the accounted for the majority of the decrease in property crime. Since 1993, the rate of property crime has declined from 351.8 to 131.4 victimizations per 1,000 households.

HIGHLIGHTS

Violent crime

  • „  The rate of violent crime declined slightly from 26.1 victimizations per 1,000 persons in 2012 to 23.2 per 1,000 in 2013.
  • „  No statistically signi cant change was detected
    in the rate of serious violent crime (rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault) from 2012 to 2013 (7.3 per 1,000).
  • „  From 2012 to 2013, no statistically signi cant changes occurred in the rates of domestic violence, intimate partner violence, violence resulting in an injury, or violence involving a rearm.
  • „  Violent crimes committed by a stranger decreased from 10.3 per 1,000 in 2012 to 7.9 per 1,000 in 2013.
  • „  In 2013, 46% of violent victimizations and 61% of serious violent victimizations were reported to police.

Figuree11
Violent and property victimization, 1993–2013

Violent crime rate
per 1,000 persons age 12 or older

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

Property crime rate per 1,000 households

400 350 300 250

Property victimization 200 150

100 Violent victimization 50

September 2014, NCJ 247648

0 ’93 ’94 ’95 ’96 ’97 ’98 ’99 ’00 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05’06*’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 0 Note: See appendix table 1 for estimates and standard errors.

*See Criminal Victimization, 2007 (NCJ 224390, BJS web, December 2008) for information on changes in the 2006 NCVS.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1993–2013.

Property crime

„ The rate of property crime decreased from 155.8 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 131.4 per 1,000 in 2013.

Prevalence of crime

„ In 2013, 1.2% of all persons age 12 or older (3 million persons) experienced at least one violent victimization. About 0.4% (1.1 million persons) experienced at least one serious violent victimization.

„ The prevalence rate of violent victimization declined from 1.4% of all persons age 12 or older in 2012 to 1.2% in 2013.

„ In 2013, 9% of all households (11.5 million households) experienced one or more property victimizations.

BJS

Bulletin

No signi cant change occurred in the rate of serious violent crime from 2012 to 2013

ere was no statistically signi cant change in the rate of serious violent crime—de ned as rape or sexual assault,

Table 1

robbery, and aggravated assault—from 2012 (8.0 per 1,000) to 2013 (7.3 per 1,000) (table 1). In 2013, the rates of total violent crime and serious violent crime were lower than the rates observed a decade earlier in 2004.

Violent victimization, by type of violent crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

number

ratea

type of violent crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Violent crimeb

6,726,060

6,842,590

6,126,420

27.8

26.1

23.2 ‡

Rape/sexual assault

255,770

346,830

300,170

1.1

1.3

1.1

Robbery

616,420

741,760

645,650

2.6

2.8

2.4

Assault

5,853,870

5,754,010

5,180,610

24.2

22.0

19.6

Aggravated assault

1,418,660

996,110

994,220

5.9

3.8

3.8

Simple assault

4,435,220

4,757,900

4,186,390

18.3

18.2

15.8 ‡

Domestic violencec

1,434,190

1,259,390

1,116,090

5.9

4.8

4.2

Intimate partner violenced

1,031,720

810,790

748,800

4.3

3.1

2.8

Stranger violence

2,672,240

2,710,110

2,098,170 †

11.1

10.3

7.9†

Violent crime involving injury

1,984,920

1,573,460

1,603,960

8.2

6.0

6.1

Serious violent crimee

2,290,850

2,084,690

1,940,030

9.5

8.0

7.3

Serious domestic violencec

467,240

411,080

464,730

1.9

1.6

1.8

Serious intimate partner violenced

334,620

270,240

360,820

1.4

1.0

1.4

Serious stranger violence

966,390

1,020,400

737,940 ‡

4.0

3.9

2.8‡

Serious violent crime involving weapons

1,650,430

1,415,120

1,174,370

6.8

5.4

4.4

Serious violent crime involving injury

828,620

762,170

739,210

3.4

2.9

2.8

Note: Detail may not sum to total due to rounding. Total population age 12 or older was 241,703,710 in 2004; 261,996,320 in 2012; and 264,411,700 in 2013. See appendix table 2 for standard errors.

† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.
aPer 1,000 persons age 12 or older.
bExcludes homicide because the NCVS is based on interviews with victims and therefore cannot measure murder. cIncludes victimization committed by intimate partners and family members.

dIncludes victimization committed by current or former spouses, boyfriends, or girlfriends. eIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

e National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)

The NCVS collects information on nonfatal crimes reported and not reported to the police against persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households. Initial NCVS interviews are conducted in person with subsequent interviews conducted either in person or by phone. In 2013, the response rate was 84% for households and 88% for eligible persons. The NCVS produces national rates and levels of violent and property victimization, as well as information on the characteristics of crimes and victims, and the consequences of victimization.

Since NCVS is based on interviews with victims, it does not measure homicide.

The NCVS measures the violent crimes of rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault. The NCVS classi es rape, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault as serious violent crimes. Property crimes include household burglary, motor vehicle theft, and theft. The survey also measures personal larceny, which includes pickpocketing and purse snatching. For additional estimates not included in this

report, see the NCVS Victimization Analysis Tool (NVAT) on the BJS website.

Victimization is the basic unit of analysis used throughout most
of this report. A victimization is a crime as it a ects one person or household. For personal crimes, the number of victimizations is equal to the number of victims present during a criminal incident. The number of victimizations may be greater than the number
of incidents because more than one person may be victimized during an incident. Each crime against a household is counted as having a single victim—the a ected household.

The victimization rate is a measure of the occurrence of victimizations among a speci ed population group. For personal crimes, the victimization rate is based on the number of victimizations per 1,000 residents age 12 or older. For household crimes, the victimization rate is calculated using the number of incidents per 1,000 households. Estimates are presented for 2013, 2012, and then for 2004, the 10-year change.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 2

Violence committed by a stranger decreased from 2012 to 2013

e rate of domestic violence—crime committed by intimate partners and family members—remained at from 2012 to 2013 (4.2 per 1,000). No measurable change was detected from 2012 to 2013 in rates of intimate partner violence

(2.8 per 1,000), which includes victimizations committed by current or former spouses, boyfriends, or girlfriends. Violent victimizations committed by a stranger decreased from
10.3 victimizations per 1,000 persons in 2012 to 7.9 per 1,000 in 2013. e rates of domestic violence, intimate partner violence, and violence committed by a stranger in 2013 were lower than rates in 2004. No statistically signi cant di erence was found in the rates of serious violent crime involving weapons (4.4 per 1,000) or resulting in injury to the victim (2.8 per 1,000) from 2012 to 2013. e rate of serious violent crime involving weapons in 2013 was lower than the rate

in 2004.

No statistically signi cant change occurred in rearm violence from 2012 to 2013

ere was no statistically signi cant change in the rate of rearm violence from 2012 (1.8 per 1,000) to 2013 (1.3 per 1,000) (table 2). e rate of rearm violence in 2013 was

Table 2

Firearm violence, 2004–2013

slightly lower than the rate in 2004 (1.9 per 1,000). In 2013, there were 332,950 nonfatal rearm victimizations, compared to 460,720 in 2012. In 2013, about 75% of all serious violent crimes that involved a rearm were reported to police. ere was no measurable change in the percentage of rearm violence reported to police from 2012 to 2013.

Thefts accounted for the majority of the decrease in property crime

A er increasing for 2 years, the number and rate of
property crime victimization decreased from 2012 to 2013 (table 3). e rate of property crime victimization decreased from 155.8 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 131.4 per 1,000 in 2013, and was driven primarily by a decrease in the . e rate of the decreased from 120.9 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 100.5 per 1,000 in 2013. e rate of household burglary decreased from 29.9 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 25.7 per 1,000 in 2013, while no measurable change occurred in the rate of motor vehicle the during the same period (about 5 per 1,000). In 2013, the rates of property crime, burglary, the , and motor vehicle the were lower than the rates in 2004.

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Firearm incidents

405,770

446,370

552,040

448,410

331,620

383,390

378,800

415,160

427,700

290,620

Firearm victimizations

456,510

503,530

614,410

554,780

371,290

410,110

415,000

467,930

460,720

332,950

Rate of rearm violence*

1.9

2.1

2.5

2.2

1.5

1.6

1.6

1.8

1.8

1.3

Percent of rearm victimizations reported to police

77.3% 72.3% 71.0% 52.9% 70.8%

61.5%

50.9%

73.5%

66.4%

75.3%

Note: Includes violent incidents and victimizations in which the o ender had, showed, or used a rearm. See appendix table 3 for standard errors. *Per 1,000 persons age 12 or older.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004–2013.

Table 3

Property victimization, by type of property crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Note: Detail may not sum to total due to rounding. Total number of households was 115,775,570 in 2004; 125,920,480 in 2012; and 127,622,320 in 2013. See appendix table 4 for standard errors.

† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
*Per 1,000 households.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

number

rate*

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Total

19,394,780

19,622,980

16,774,090 †

167.5

155.8

131.4 †

Burglary

3,598,570

3,764,540

3,286,210 †

31.1

29.9

25.7 †

Motor vehicle theft

1,068,480

633,740

661,250

9.2

5.0

5.2

Theft

14,727,730

15,224,700

12,826,620 †

127.2

120.9

100.5 †

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 3

Prevalence of crime

Annual estimates of a population’s risk for criminal victimization can be examined using victimization rates or prevalence rates. Historically, BJS reports using NCVS data rely on victimization rates, which measure the extent to which victimizations occur in a speci ed population during a speci c time. Victimization rates are used throughout this bulletin. For crimes a ecting persons, NCVS victimization rates are estimated by dividing the number of victimizations that occur during a speci ed time (T) by the population at risk for those victimizations and multiplying the rate by 1,000.

period, prevalence rates are presented by type of crime and certain demographic characteristics. (For further information about measuring prevalence in the NCVS, see Measuring the Prevalence of Crime with the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCJ 241656, BJS web, September 2013).

in 2013, 0.4% of all persons age 12 or older experienced serious violence

In 2013, 1.2% of all persons age 12 or older (3 million persons) experienced at least one violent victimization (table 4). During the same period, about 0.4% of all persons age 12 or older
(1.1 million persons) experienced at least one serious violent victimization (rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault). The prevalence rate of violent victimization declined from 1.4% of all persons age 12 or older in 2012 to 1.2% in 2013. No measurable change occurred in the prevalence rate of serious violent victimization from 2012 to 2013. During the same period, prevalence rates of robbery (0.1%) and simple assault (0.8%)

also declined.

Less than 1% of all persons age 12 or older experienced one
or more domestic violence (0.2%) or intimate partner violence (0.1%) victimizations in 2013. No measurable change occurred
in the prevalence rates of domestic violence and intimate partner violence from 2012 to 2013. The prevalence of violence committed by strangers declined from 0.6% of all persons age 12 or older in 2012 to 0.5% in 2013.

In 2013, 9.0% of all households (11.5 million households) experienced one or more property victimizations. The prevalence rate of property victimization declined from 10.4% in 2012
to 9.0% in 2013. During the same period, the prevalence of household burglary and theft also declined. Similar to the property victimization rate, the decline in the prevalence rate of theft accounted for the majority of the decline in the prevalence rate of property victimization.

Continued on next page

Number of victimizations experienced Victimization rate T = by a speci ed population T

Number of persons in the speci ed populationT

x 1,000

Prevalence rates also describe the level of victimization but are based on the number of unique persons (or households) in the population who experienced at least one victimization during a speci ed time. The key distinction between a victimization rate and a prevalence rate is whether the numerator consists of the number of victimizations or the number of victims. For example, a person who experienced two robberies on separate occasions within the past year would be counted twice in the victimization rate but counted once in the prevalence rate. Prevalence rates are estimated by dividing the number of victims in the speci ed population by the total number of persons in the population and multiplying the rate by 100. This is the percentage of the population victimized at least once in a given period.

Prevalence rate T = Number of victims in a speci ed population T Number of persons in the speci ed populationT

Victimization and prevalence rates may also be produced for household crimes, such as burglary. In these instances, the numerators and denominators are adjusted to re ect households rather than persons. To better understand the percentage

of the population that is victimized at least once in a given

x 100

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 4

Prevalence of crime (continued)

Table 4

Number of victims and prevalence rate, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

number of victimsa

prevalence rateb

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Violent crimec

3,478,620

3,575,900

3,041,170 †

1.4%

1.4%

1.2% †

Rape/sexual assault

134,860

170,400

173,610

0.1

0.1

0.1

Robbery

358,780

498,780

369,070 †

0.1

0.2

0.1†

Assault

3,028,230

3,011,130

2,600,920 †

1.3

1.1

1.0†

Aggravated assault

794,400

633,590

633,090

0.3

0.2

0.2

Simple assault

2,349,840

2,469,270

2,046,600 †

1.0

0.9

0.8†

Domestic violenced

649,950

643,680

589,140

0.3

0.2

0.2

Intimate partner violencee

401,880

385,500

369,310

0.2

0.1

0.1

Stranger violence

1,592,450

1,610,520

1,244,560 †

0.7

0.6

0.5†

Violent crime involving injury

1,064,350

940,010

849,240

0.4

0.4

0.3

Serious violent crimef

1,276,560

1,271,770

1,145,350

0.5%

0.5%

0.4%

Serious domestic violenced

208,190

244,230

231,170

0.1

0.1

0.1

Serious intimate partner violencee

135,380

160,790

163,480

0.1

0.1

0.1

Serious stranger violence

619,190

665,850

497,920 †

0.3

0.3

0.2†

Serious violent crime involving weapons

930,350

824,320

738,540

0.4

0.3

0.3

Serious violent crime involving injury

446,260

469,120

420,890

0.2

0.2

0.2

property crimeg

12,085,300

13,111,940

11,531,420 †

10.4%

10.4%

9.0% †

Burglary

2,450,560

2,694,260

2,458,360 †

2.1

2.1

1.9†

Motor vehicle theft

785,460

519,540

555,660

0.7

0.4

0.4

Theft

9,589,480

10,595,290

9,070,680 †

8.3

8.4

7.1†

Note: Detail may not sum to total because a person or household may experience multiple types of crime. See appendix table 5 for standard errors. † Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.

aNumber of persons age 12 or older who experienced at least one victimization during the year for violent crime, and number of households that experienced at least one victimization during the year for property crime.

bPercentage of persons age 12 or older who experienced at least one victimization during the year for violent crime, and percentage of households that experienced at least one victimization during the year for property crime.

cExcludes homicide because the NCVS is based on interviews with victims and therefore cannot measure murder. dIncludes victimization committed by intimate partners and family members.
eIncludes victimization committed by current or former spouses, boyfriends, or girlfriends.
fIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.

gIncludes household burglary, motor vehicle theft, and theft.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Continued on next page

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 5

Prevalence of crime (continued)

persons ages 12 to 17 had the highest prevalence of violence (2.2%) of all age groups in 2013

In 2013, 1.2% of all males age 12 or older (1.6 million males)
and 1.1% of all females (1.5 million females) experienced one or more violent victimizations (table 5). While the prevalence rate declined for both males and females from 2012 to 2013, a slightly higher percentage of males (1.2%) than females (1.1%) were victims of one or more violent crimes in 2013.

In 2013, about 57,300 Asians experienced one or more violent crimes during the year and had the lowest prevalence rate (0.4%) of the U.S. population. The percentage of the population who experienced violence was highest among American Indians or Alaska Natives (2.8%), accounting for 38,310 crime victims, and persons of two or more races (3.6%), accounting for 114,190 crime victims. Although there were over 3 times more white victims (1.9 million) than black (430,380) and Hispanic (540,130) victims in 2013, blacks (1.3%) and Hispanics (1.3%) had higher prevalence rates than whites (1.1%). This was a shift from 2004, when Hispanics (1.2%) had a lower prevalence rate than both whites (1.5%) and blacks (1.7%).

Table 5

The prevalence of violence declined for whites, blacks, and Asians from 2012 to 2013. Among Hispanics and American Indians or Alaska Natives, there was no signi cant change in
the percentage of the population that experienced one or more violent crimes during the year. Among persons of two or more races, the prevalence rate increased from 2.0% of the population experiencing violence in 2012 to 3.6% in 2013.

In 2013, 545,370 persons ages 12 to 17, or about 2.2% of all persons ages 12 to 17, experienced at least one violent crime. Persons ages 12 to 17 had the highest prevalence of violence of all age groups. In comparison, persons age 65 or older had the lowest prevalence rate with 0.3% of the population experiencing one or more violent crimes. From 2012 to 2013, the prevalence of violent crime declined for persons ages 18 to 24, ages 25 to 34, and age 65 or older.

Persons who were never married had a higher prevalence rate of violence (1.8%) than persons who were married (0.6%). Persons who were separated had the highest prevalence of violence, with 3.3% experiencing one or more violent crimes. From 2012 to 2013, the prevalence of violence declined among both persons who were never married and persons who were married, but the rate remained at for persons of all other marital statuses.

Prevalence of violent crime, by victim demographic characteristics, 2004, 2012, and 2013

number of victimsa prevalence rateb

Victim demographic characteristic 2004

2012

2013 2004

2012

2013

total 3,478,620

3,575,900

3,041,170 † 1.4%

1.4%

1.2% †

Sex

Male 1,925,560

1,917,390

1,567,070 † 1.6%

1.5%

1.2% †

Female 1,553,060

1,658,520

1,474,090 † 1.3

1.2

1.1†

race/Hispanic origin

Whitec 2,474,200

2,186,520

1,860,870 † 1.5%

1.3%

1.1% †

Black/African Americanc 475,090

598,100

430,380 † 1.7

1.9

1.3†

Hispanic/Latino 373,740

592,230

540,130 1.2

1.5

1.3

American Indian/Alaska Nativec 34,840

27,980

38,310 3.4

1.9

2.8

Asian/Native Hawaiian/other Paci c Islanderc 55,750

105,990

57,300 † 0.6

0.8

0.4†

Two or more racesc 65,010

65,080

114,190 † 3.7

2.0

3.6†

age

12–17 714,180

617,820

545,370 2.8%

2.5%

2.2%

18–24 800,770

716,360

527,410 † 2.8

2.3

1.7†

25–34 624,510

712,600

604,500 † 1.6

1.7

1.4†

35-49 885,990

785,440

684,150 ‡ 1.4

1.3

1.1

50–64 393,700

582,760

566,990 0.8

1.0

0.9

65 or older 59,480

160,930

112,760 † 0.2

0.4

0.3†

marital status

Never married 1,964,120

1,894,560

1,626,980 † 2.5%

2.1%

1.8% †

Married 891,720

966,420

738,410 † 0.7

0.8

0.6†

Widowed 45,230

71,370

74,880 0.3

0.5

0.5

Divorced 384,980

465,360

405,420 1.8

1.8

1.6

Separated 180,110

164,500

171,630 3.9

3.3

3.3

Note: Detail may not sum to total due to rounding. See appendix table 6 for standard errors.
† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.
aNumber of persons age 12 or older who experienced at least one victimization during the year for violent crime. bPercentage of persons age 12 or older who experienced at least one victimization during the year for violent crime. cExcludes persons of Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

In 2013, 46% of violent victimizations were reported to police

e NCVS allows for an examination of crimes reported
and not reported to police. Victims may not report the victimization for a variety of reasons, including fear of reprisal or getting the o ender in trouble, believing that police would not or could not do anything to help, and believing the crime to be a personal issue or trivial. Police noti cation can come from the victim, a third party (including witnesses, other victims, household members, or other o cials, such as school o cials or workplace managers), or police being at the scene of the incident. Police noti cation may occur during or immediately following a criminal incident or at a later date.

From 2012 to 2013, there was no statistically signi cant change in the percentage of violent and serious violent victimizations reported to police (table 6). In 2013, 46% of violent victimizations and 61% of serious violent victimizations were reported to police. A greater percentage of robbery (68%) and aggravated assault (64%) were reported to police than simple assault (38%) and rape or sexual assault (35%) victimizations.

From 2012 to 2013, the percentage of property victimizations reported to police increased from 34% to 36%. e percentage of reported the s increased from 26% to 29% during the
same period, accounting for the majority of the increase in the overall percentage of property victimizations reported to police. No measurable change was detected in the percentage of burglaries and motor vehicle the s reported to police from 2012 to 2013. Similar to previous years, a larger percentage of motor vehicle the s (75%) than burglaries (57%) and other the s (29%) were reported to police in 2013.

Table 6

Percent of victimizations reported to police, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

Violent crimea

50.3%

44.2%

45.6%

Rape/sexual assault

29.3

28.2

34.8

Robbery

60.6

55.9

68.0‡

Assault

50.1

43.7

43.4

Aggravated assault

69.8

62.4

64.3

Simple assault

43.9

39.7

38.5

Domestic violenceb

56.6

54.9

56.9

Intimate partner violencec

56.4

53.3

57.0

Stranger violence

54.4

48.9

49.6

Violent crime involving injury

60.8

58.6

55.5

Serious violent crimed

62.8%

54.4%

61.0%

Serious domestic violenceb

69.7

60.9

65.3

Serious intimate partner violencec

69.1

55.4

60.4

Serious stranger violence

67.9

54.8

61.9

Serious violent crime involving weapons

68.5

56.3

65.7

Serious violent crime involving injury

69.0

56.1

66.2

property crimee

39.2%

33.5%

36.1%†

Household burglary

53.3

54.8

57.3

Motor vehicle theft

85.6

78.6

75.5

Theft

32.4

26.4

28.6†

Note: See appendix table 7 for standard errors.

† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.

‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.

aExcludes homicide because the NCVS is based on interviews with victims and therefore cannot measure murder.

bIncludes victimization committed by intimate partners and family members.

cIncludes victimization committed by current or former spouses, boyfriends, or girlfriends.

dIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault. eIncludes household burglary, motor vehicle theft, and theft.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014

7

Rates of property crime reported and not reported to police declined from 2012 to 2013

From 2012 to 2013, no di erences were detected in the overall rates of violence reported and not reported to police (table 7). Among violent and serious violent victimizations reported to police, the only signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 was in the rate of violence committed by a stranger, which declined slightly from 5.1 to 3.9 victimizations per 1,000 persons age
12 or older. ere was no signi cant change in the rates of domestic violence or intimate partner violence reported to police from 2012 to 2013. Among violent victimizations not reported to police, the rates of robbery, violence and serious violence committed by a stranger, and serious violent crime involving weapons declined from 2012 to 2013. e rates of robbery declined slightly from 1.2 victimizations per 1,000 in 2012 to 0.8 per 1,000 in 2013. e rates of unreported violence committed by a stranger declined slightly from 5.0 per 1,000 in 2012 to 3.8 per 1,000 in 2013. For other types of violence, the rates of unreported victimization were similar in 2012

and 2013.

In comparison, overall rates of property crime reported and not reported to police declined from 2012 to 2013. e overall rate of property crime reported to police decreased from 52.2 to 47.4 victimizations per 1,000 households. is decline was

Table 7

driven largely by a decrease in the s reported to police from 2012 (31.9 per 1,000) to 2013 (28.7 per 1,000). e rate of unreported property crime declined from 101.9 victimizations per 1,000 households in 2012 to 83.1 per 1,000 in 2013. Among speci c crime types that went unreported, the rate of unreported burglaries declined from 13.2 per 1,000 in 2012 to 10.9 in 2013, and the rate of unreported the decreased from 87.7 to 71.0 victimizations per 1,000 households. ere was no change in the rate of reported or unreported motor vehicle the victimizations from 2012 to 2013.

In 2013, 10% of violent crime victims received assistance from a victim service agency

Victim service agencies are publicly or privately funded organizations that provide victims with support and services to aid their physical and emotional recovery, o er protection from future victimizations, guide them through the criminal justice system process, and assist them in obtaining restitution. In 2013, about 10% of victims of violent crime received assistance from a victim service agency, which was not statistically di erent from 2012 (table 8). ere was also no statistical di erence in the percentage of victims who received assistance in 2004 compared to 2013. In 2013, a greater percentage of victims of serious violence (14%) received assistance than victims of simple assault (8%).

Rates of victimizations reported and not reported to police, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

reported to police

not reported to police

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Violent crimea

14.0

11.5

10.6

13.6

14.0

12.2

Rape/sexual assault

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.7

0.9

0.7

Robbery

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.0

1.2

0.8

Assault

12.1

9.6

8.5

11.8

11.9

10.7

Aggravated assault

4.1

2.4

2.4

1.8

1.3

1.3

Simple assault

8.0

7.2

6.1

10.1

10.6

9.5

Domestic violenceb

3.4

2.6

2.4

2.5

2.0

1.7

Intimate partner violencec

2.4

1.6

1.6

1.8

1.3

1.2

Stranger violence

6.0

5.1

3.9‡

4.9

5.0

3.8‡

Violent crime involving injury

5.0

3.5

3.4

3.1

2.4

2.6

Serious violent crimed

6.0

4.3

4.5

3.5

3.5

2.8

Serious domestic violenceb

1.3

1.0

1.1

0.6

0.6

0.6

Serious intimate partner violencec

1.0

0.6

0.8

0.4

0.4

0.5

Serious stranger violence

2.7

2.1

1.7

1.3

1.7

1.0†

Serious violent crime involving weapons

4.7

3.0

2.9

2.1

2.3

1.5

Serious violent crime involving injury

2.4

1.6

1.9

1.1

1.2

0.9

property crime

65.7

52.2

47.4

100.0

101.9

83.1

Burglary

16.6

16.4

14.8

14.1

13.2

10.9

Motor vehicle theft

7.9

4.0

3.9

1.3

1.1

1.2

Theft

41.2

31.9

28.7

84.6

87.7

71.0

Note: Victimization rates are per 1,000 persons age 12 or older for violent crime and per 1,000 households for property crime. See appendix table 8 for standard errors. † Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.
aExcludes homicide because the NCVS is based on interviews and therefore cannot measure murder..

bIncludes victimization committed by intimate partners and family members.
cIncludes victimization committed by current or former spouses, boyfriends, or girlfriends. dIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 8

Table 8

Violent crime victims who received assistance from a victim service agency, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Note: See appendix table 9 for standard errors.

aIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.

bIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Table 9

Violent crime decreased for males but did not change signi cantly for females

From 2012 to 2013, the rate of violent victimization for males declined from 29.1 victimizations per 1,000 males to 23.7 per 1,000 (table 9). Unlike in 2012 when males had a higher rate of victimization than females, there was no signi cant di erence in male (23.7 per 1,000) and female (22.7 per 1,000) violent victimization rates in 2013.

e rate of violent victimization for blacks declined from
34.2 victimizations per 1,000 in 2012 to 25.1 per 1,000 in 2013. Both the rates for whites and Hispanics remained at from 2012 to 2013. Unlike in 2012, the rates of violent crime for blacks (25.1 per 1,000), whites (22.2 per 1,000), and Hispanics (24.8 per 1,000) were similar in 2013 due to the decline in the rates for blacks.

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

Violent crimea

10.7%

8.2%

9.5%

Serious violent crimeb

13.1

9.6

13.7

Simple assault

9.5

7.6

7.6

Violent crime resulting in injury

17.1%

14.9%

17.2%

Violent crime involving weapons

11.5%

8.8%

7.4%

Violent victimization, by victim demographic characteristics, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Violent crimea Serious violent crimeb

Victim demographic characteristic 2004

2012

2013 2004

2012

2013

total 27.8

26.1

23.2 ‡ 9.5

8.0

7.3

Sex

Male 30.2

29.1

23.7 † 10.6

9.4

7.7

Female 25.5

23.3

22.7 8.4

6.6

7.0

race/Hispanic origin

Whitec 28.5

25.2

22.2 9.0

6.8

6.8

Black/African Americanc 30.2

34.2

25.1 † 16.3

11.3

9.5

Hispanic/Latino 20.1

24.5

24.8 6.5

9.3

7.5

American Indian/Alaska Nativec 165.6

46.9

56.3 46.1 !

26.2 !

39.0 !

Asian/Native Hawaiian/other Paci c Islanderc 11.3

16.4

7.0 † 3.9

9.1

1.6 † !

Two or more racesc 77.6

42.8

90.3 † 11.6 !

9.5!

26.8 †

age

12–17 49.7

48.4

52.1 13.7

9.9

10.8

18–24 55.4

41.0

33.8 19.9

14.7

10.7

25–34 31.2

34.2

29.6 10.9

10.9

10.2

35–49 28.0

29.1

20.3

† 9.9

9.5

7.1

50–64 15.4

15.0

18.7

5.7

4.6

6.9

65 or older 2.5

5.7

5.4

0.8

1.6

1.1

marital status

Never married 46.2

40.7

36.3

16.5

11.9

9.6

Married 13.8

13.5

10.7

‡ 4.5

3.9

3.2

Widowed 9.3

8.3

8.6

1.8

!

2.6

5.2

Divorced 36.7

37.0

34.4

11.8

10.9

16.0

Separated 110.7

83.1

73.2

38.9

39.5

33.3

Note: Victimization rates are per 1,000 persons age 12 or older. See appendix table 10 for standard errors.
† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.
! Interpret with caution. Estimate based on 10 or fewer sample cases, or the coe cient of variation is greater than 50%. aIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.

bIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.
cExcludes persons of Hispanic or Latino origin.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 9

From 2012 to 2013, violent victimization rates declined for persons ages 35 to 49, from 29.1 to 20.3 victimizations per 1,000. ere was no measurable change in the rates of violent or serious violent crime for all other age groups. In 2013, persons ages 12 to 17 (52.1 per 1,000) had a higher rate of violent victimization than persons in other age groups.

With the exception of persons who were married, rates of violent victimization remained at from 2012 to 2013 for persons of all marital statuses. Violent victimization rates for persons who were married decreased from 13.5 victimizations per 1,000 persons in 2012 to 10.7 per 1,000 in 2013. Persons who were married (10.7 per 1,000) had a lower rate of violence than persons who were never married (36.3 per 1,000), divorced (34.4 per 1,000), or separated (73.2 per 1,000). Persons who were separated had the highest rate of violence in 2013. e NCVS collects information on a respondent’s marital status at the time of the interview but does not obtain marital status at the time of the incident. For example, persons who are separated may have experienced a victimization while married.

Violent victimization in urban areas declined from 2012 to 2013

From 2012 to 2013, the rate of violent victimization for persons living in the South declined slightly, from 22.1 victimizations per 1,000 persons to 18.0 per 1,000 (table 10). e rate of

Table 10

violence in the West declined from 35.5 victimizations per 1,000 persons to 27.3 per 1,000. e declines in these two regions largely accounted for the slight decline in the rate
of overall violence, as there were no statistically signi cant changes in rates of violent victimization in the Northeast
or Midwest from 2012 to 2013. ere was a slight increase in the rate of serious violence in the Northeast, from 4.6 victimizations per 1,000 in 2012 to 7.8 per 1,000 in 2013, but no other regions experienced a change in serious violence.

Urban areas accounted for most of the slight decline in the overall rate of violent victimization. e rate of violence declined in urban areas, from 32.4 to 25.9 victimizations per 1,000. ere was no measurable change in the rates of violent victimization in suburban or rural areas from 2012 to 2013. Rates of serious violence did not show a statistically signi cant change in any of the three areas.

From 2012 to 2013, property crime rates decreased in all regions of the country and across urban, suburban, and rural areas. In 2013, property crime rates were highest in the West (182.1 per 1,000) and lowest in the Northeast (92.1 per 1,000). Urban areas (165.3 per 1,000) had a higher rate of property crime than suburban (115.3 per 1,000) and rural (109.4 per 1,000) areas.

Violent and property victimization, by household location, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Violent crimea

Serious violent crimeb

property crimec

Household location

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

total

27.8

26.1

23.2 ‡

9.5

8.0

7.3

167.5

155.8

131.4†

region

Northeast

19.6

24.7

27.5

8.0

4.6

7.8‡

113.8

116.9

92.1 †

Midwest

33.1

23.9

23.7

11.8

8.6

7.5

177.4

153.1

122.3 †

South

25.1

22.1

18.0 ‡

8.5

6.2

5.5

163.3

143.4

125.8 †

West

33.6

35.5

27.3 †

9.9

12.5

9.6

210.3

210.5

182.1 †

location of residence

Urban

37.3

32.4

25.9 †

14.6

11.4

8.8

220.1

187.0

165.3 †

Suburban

23.0

23.8

23.3

7.7

6.6

6.8

147.7

138.9

115.3 †

Rural

27.1

20.9

16.9

6.8

5.1

6.1

140.4

142.9

109.4 †

Note: Victimization rates are per 1,000 persons age 12 or older for violent crime and per 1,000 households for property crime. See appendix table 11 for standard errors. † Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level.
‡ Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 90% con dence level.
aIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.

bIncludes rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.
cIncludes household burglary, motor vehicle theft, and theft.
Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 10

e NCVS and UCR showed similar declines in property crime from 2012 to 2013

In the rst half of 2013, preliminary ndings from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program showed a decline in the number of violent and property crimes (table 11). The Bureau
of Justice Statistics’ National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) also showed a signi cant decline in property crime victimization from 2012 to 2013 (down 15%) and a slight decline in violent victimizations (down 10%).

Because the NCVS and UCR measure an overlapping, but not identical, set of o enses and use di erent methodologies, congruity between the estimates is not expected. Throughout the 40-year history of the NCVS, both programs have generally demonstrated similar year-to-year increases or decreases in the levels of overall violent and property crimes. However, in recent years, this has not always been the case for certain crime types.

As measured by the UCR, violent crime includes murder
and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crime includes burglary, larceny- theft, and motor vehicle theft. The UCR measures crimes known to the police, occurring against both persons and businesses. The FBI obtains data on crimes from law enforcement agencies, while the NCVS collects data through interviews with victims. Additional information about the di erences between the two programs can be found in The Nation’s Two Crime Measures
(NCJ 246832, BJS web, September 2014).

Signi cant methodological and de nitional di erences exist between the NCVS and UCR:

  • „  The NCVS obtains estimates of crimes both reported and not reported to the police, while the UCR collects data on crimes known to and recorded by the police.
  • „  The UCR includes homicide, arson, and commercial crimes, while the NCVS excludes these crime types.
  • „  The UCR excludes simple assault and sexual assault, which are included in the NCVS.*
  • „  The NCVS data are estimates from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households, while the UCR data are estimates based on counts of crimes reported by law enforcement jurisdictions.
  • „  The NCVS excludes crimes against children age 11 or younger, persons in institutions (e.g., nursing homes and correctional institutions), and may exclude highly mobile populations
    and homeless people. However, victimizations against these persons are included in the UCR.

    *Simple assaults include attacks or attempted attacks without a weapon resulting in either no injury or minor injury. Sexual assaults include attacks or attempted attacks generally involving unwanted sexual contact between the victim and o ender that may or may not involve force.

Given these di erences, the two measures of crime should complement each other and provide a more comprehensive picture of crime in the United States.

In the rst half of 2013 compared to the same period in 2012, there were consistent declines in UCR violent and property crimes known to police across all crime types. The number of NCVS property crimes reported to police also declined 8% from 2012 to 2013, while the apparent decline in the NCVS estimate of overall violent crime was not statistically signi cant. Among other NCVS violent crime types, the number of victimizations reported to police did not change signi cantly from 2012 to 2013. However, unlike declines in the UCR’s semiannual estimates of forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, the general direction of change in the NCVS estimates of rape and sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault appeared to be positive.

Table 11

Percent change in the number of crimes reported in the UCR and the NCVS, 2012–2013

nCVS

type of crime

UCr

total

reported to police

Violent crimea

-5.4%

-10.5%

-7.6%

Serious violent crimeb

~

-6.9%

4.3%

Murder

-6.9%

~

~

Forcible rapec

-10.6

-13.5

6.8

Robbery

-1.8

-13.0

5.9

Aggravated assault

-6.6

-0.2

2.9

property crime

-5.4%

-14.5% †

-8.0% †

Burglary

-8.1

-12.7 †

-8.7

Motor vehicle theft

-3.2

4.3

0.1

~Not applicable.
† Signi cant change from 2012 to 2013 at the 95% con dence level .

aUCR estimates include murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. NCVS estimates exclude murder, and includes sexual and simple assaults.

bNCVS estimates include rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.

cNCVS estimates include rape and other sexual assault, and measures victimization against both males and females.

Sources: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2012–2013; and FBI, Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report, January–June 2013, retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/ preliminary-semiannual-uniform-crime-report-january-june-2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 11

methodology

Survey coverage

e National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is an annual data collection conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). e NCVS is a self-report survey in which interviewed persons are asked about the number and characteristics of victimizations experienced during the prior 6 months. e NCVS collects information

on nonfatal personal crimes (rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated and simple assault, and personal larceny) and household property crimes (burglary, motor vehicle the ,
and other the ) both reported and not reported to police. In addition to providing annual level and change estimates on criminal victimization, the NCVS is the primary source of information on the nature of criminal victimization incidents.

Survey respondents provide information about themselves (e.g., age, sex, race and Hispanic origin, marital status, education level, and income) and whether they experienced a victimization. e NCVS collects information for each victimization incident about the o ender (e.g., age, race and Hispanic origin, sex, and victim–o ender relationship), characteristics of the crime (including time and place of occurrence, use of weapons, nature of injury, and economic consequences), whether the crime was reported to police, reasons the crime was or was not reported, and victim experiences with the criminal justice system.

e NCVS is administered to persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of households in the United States. e NCVS de nes a household as a group of persons who all reside at a sampled address. Persons are considered household members when the sampled address is their usual place of residence at the time of the interview and when they have no usual place of residence elsewhere. Once selected, households remain in the sample for 3 years, and eligible persons in these households are interviewed every

6 months either in person or over the phone for a total of seven interviews.

All rst interviews are conducted in person with subsequent interviews conducted either in person or by phone. New households rotate into the sample on an ongoing basis to replace outgoing households that have been in the sample for the 3-year period. e sample includes persons living in group quarters, such as dormitories, rooming houses, and religious group dwellings, and excludes persons living in military barracks and institutional settings such as correctional or hospital facilities, and homeless persons.

Nonresponse and weighting adjustments

In 2013, 90,630 households and 160,040 persons age 12 or older were interviewed for the NCVS. Each household was interviewed twice during the year. e response rate was 84% for households and 88% for eligible persons. Victimizations

that occurred outside of the United States were excluded from this report. In 2013, less than 1% of the unweighted victimizations occurred outside of the United States and were excluded from the analyses.

Estimates in this report use data from the 1993 to 2013 NCVS data les, weighted to produce annual estimates
of victimization for persons age 12 or older living in
U.S. households. Because the NCVS relies on a sample rather than a census of the entire U.S. population, weights are designed to in ate sample point estimates to known population totals and to compensate for survey nonresponse and other aspects of the sample design.

e NCVS data les include both person and household weights. Person weights provide an estimate of the population represented by each person in the sample. Household
weights provide an estimate of the U.S. household population represented by each household in the sample. A er proper adjustment, both household and person weights are also typically used to form the denominator in calculations of crime rates.

Victimization weights used in this analysis account for the number of persons present during an incident and for high- frequency repeat victimizations (i.e., series victimizations). Series victimizations are similar in type but occur with such frequency that a victim is unable to recall each individual event or describe each event in detail. Survey procedures allow NCVS interviewers to identify and classify these similar victimizations as series victimizations and to collect detailed information on only the most recent incident in the series.

e weight counts series incidents as the actual number
of incidents reported by the victim, up to a maximum of
10 incidents. Including series victimizations in national rates results in large increases in the level of violent victimization; however, trends in violence are generally similar, regardless of whether series victimizations are included. In 2013, series incidents accounted for about 1% of all victimizations and 4% of all violent victimizations. Weighting series incidents as the number of incidents up to a maximum of 10 incidents produces more reliable estimates of crime levels, while the cap at 10 minimizes the e ect of extreme outliers on rates. Additional information on the series enumeration is detailed in the report Methods for Counting High-Frequency Repeat Victimizations in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCJ 237308, BJS web, April 2012).

Standard error computations

When national estimates are derived from a sample, as with the NCVS, it is important to use caution when comparing one estimate to another estimate or when comparing estimates over time. Although one estimate may be larger than another, estimates based on a sample have some degree of sampling error. e sampling error of an estimate depends on several factors, including the amount of variation in the responses

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014

12

and the size of the sample. When the sampling error around an estimate is taken into account, the estimates that appear di erent may not be statistically di erent.

One measure of the sampling error associated with an estimate is the standard error. e standard error can vary from one estimate to the next. Generally, an estimate with a small standard error provides a more reliable approximation of

the true value than an estimate with a large standard error. Estimates with relatively large standard errors are associated with less precision and reliability and should be interpreted with caution.

To generate standard errors around numbers and estimates from the NCVS, the Census Bureau produced generalized variance function (GVF) parameters for BJS. e GVFs take into account aspects of the NCVS complex sample design and represent the curve tted to a selection of individual standard errors based on the Jackknife Repeated Replication technique. e GVF parameters were used to generate standard errors for each point estimate (e.g., counts, percentages, and rates) in this report.

BJS conducted tests to determine whether di erences in estimated numbers, percentages, and rates in this report were statistically signi cant once sampling error was taken into account. Using statistical programs developed speci cally
for the NCVS, all comparisons in the text were tested for signi cance. e primary test procedure was the Student’s t-statistic, which tests the di erence between two sample estimates. Di erences described as higher, lower, or di erent passed a test at the 0.05 level of statistical signi cance (95% con dence level). Di erences described as somewhat, slightly, or marginally di erent, or with some indication of di erence, passed a test at the 0.10 level of statistical signi cance (90% con dence level). Caution is required when comparing estimates not explicitly discussed in this report.

Data users can use the estimates and the standard errors of the estimates provided in this report to generate a con dence interval around the estimate as a measure of the margin of error. e following example illustrates how standard errors can be used to generate con dence intervals:

According to the NCVS, in 2013, the violent victimization rate among persons age 12 or older was 23.2 per 1,000 persons (see table 1). Using the GVFs, it was determined that the estimated victimization rate
has a standard error of 1.6 (see appendix table 2). A con dence interval around the estimate was generated by multiplying the standard errors by ±1.96 (the t-score of a normal, two-tailed distribution that excludes 2.5% at either end of the distribution). erefore, the 95% con dence interval around the 23.2 estimate from 2013 is 23.2 ± (1.6 X 1.96) or (20.0 to 26.3). In others words, if di erent samples using the same procedures were taken from the U.S. population in 2013, 95% of the time the violent victimization rate would fall between 20.1 and 26.3 per 1,000 persons.

In this report, BJS also calculated a coe cient of variation (CV) for all estimates, representing the ratio of the standard error to the estimate. CVs provide a measure of reliability and a means to compare the precision of estimates across measures with di ering levels or metrics. In cases in which the CV was greater than 50%, or the unweighted sample had 10 or fewer cases, the estimate was noted with a “!” symbol (Interpret data with caution. Estimate based on 10 or fewer sample cases, or the coe cient of variation is greater than 50%).

Methodological changes to the NCVS in 2006

Methodological changes implemented in 2006 may have a ected the crime estimates for that year to such an extent
that they are not comparable to estimates from other years. Evaluation of 2007 and later data from the NCVS conducted by BJS and the Census Bureau found a high degree of con dence that estimates for 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and

2013 are consistent with and comparable to estimates for 2005 and previous years. e reports, Criminal Victimization, 2006, NCJ 219413, December 2007; Criminal Victimization, 2007, NCJ 224390, December 2008; Criminal Victimization, 2008, NCJ 227777, September 2009; Criminal Victimization, 2009, NCJ 231327, October 2010; Criminal Victimization, 2010, NCJ 235508, September 2011; Criminal Victimization, 2011, NCJ 239437, October 2012; and Criminal Victimization, 2012, NCJ 243389, October 2013 are available on the BJS website.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014

13

appendix Table 1

Estimates and standard errors for gure 1: Violent and property victimization, 1993–2013

estimates

Standard errors

Year

Violent victimizationa

property victimizationb

Violent victimization

property victimization

1993

79.8

351.8

2.9

5.6

1994

80.0

341.2

2.7

5.7

1995

70.7

315.5

2.4

5.3

1996

64.7

289.3

2.6

4.3

1997

61.1

267.1

2.8

5.8

1998

54.1

237.1

2.6

5.3

1999

47.2

210.6

2.3

4.8

2000

37.5

190.4

2.0

5.7

2001

32.6

177.7

1.7

5.0

2002

32.1

168.2

2.1

4.2

2003

32.1

173.4

1.7

4.5

2004

27.8

167.5

1.3

3.9

2005

28.4

159.5

1.6

4.0

2006c

34.1

169.0

1.9

3.6

2007

27.2

154.9

1.5

3.5

2008

25.3

142.6

1.6

3.7

2009

22.3

132.6

1.3

3.3

2010

19.3

125.4

1.4

2.7

2011

22.6

138.7

1.4

3.5

2012

26.1

155.8

1.2

3.1

2013

23.2

131.4

1.6

2.9

aRate per 1,000 persons age 12 or older. bRate per 1,000 households.

cSee Criminal Victimization, 2007 (NCJ 224390, BJS web, December 2008) for information on changes in the 2006 NCVS.

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1993–2013.

appendix Table 2

Standard errors for table 1: Violent victimization, by type of violent crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

number

rate

type of violent crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Violent crime

325,018

313,834

427,599

1.3

1.2

1.6

Rape/sexual assault

42,250

54,400

52,203

0.2

0.2

0.2

Robbery

71,649

83,684

88,698

0.3

0.3

0.3

Assault

297,288

282,460

380,749

1.2

1.1

1.4

Aggravated assault

120,224

99,221

119,926

0.5

0.4

0.5

Simple assault

248,719

251,674

328,333

1.0

1.0

1.2

Domestic violence

134,434

126,882

148,613

0.6

0.5

0.6

Intimate partner violence

107,839

95,014

111,985

0.4

0.4

0.4

Stranger violence

204,390

211,252

232,533

0.8

0.8

0.9

Violent crime involving injury

167,270

147,036

192,221

0.7

0.6

0.7

Serious violent crime

162,887

153,202

191,668

0.7

0.6

0.7

Serious domestic violence

63,899

61,294

79,936

0.3

0.2

0.3

Serious intimate partner violence

51,446

47,019

66,895

0.2

0.2

0.3

Serious stranger violence

103,236

110,456

110,833

0.4

0.4

0.4

Serious violent crime involving weapons

147,734

137,053

154,079

0.6

0.5

0.6

Serious violent crime involving injury

93,197

91,259

110,968

0.4

0.3

0.4

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 14

appendix Table 3

Standard errors for table 2: Firearm violence, 2004–2013

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004–2013.

appendix Table 4

Standard errors for table 3: Property victimization, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

appendix Table 5

Standard errors for table 4: Number of victims and prevalence rate, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Firearm incidents

58,288

69,030

76,877

68,470

62,019

71,992

67,931

65,371

62,863

57,480

Firearm victimizations

62,937

74,811

82,561

80,010

66,653

75,355

72,425

70,968

65,925

63,225

Rate of rearm violence

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.2

Percent of rearm victimizations reported to police

4.7%

5.3%

4.9%

4.9%

6.8%

6.9%

6.3%

5.2%

5.6%

6.2%

number

rate

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Total

452,881

387,502

369,131

3.9

3.1

2.9

Burglary

162,722

146,105

136,987

1.4

1.2

1.1

Motor vehicle theft

75,127

49,704

50,769

0.6

0.4

0.4

Theft

387,850

336,706

316,083

3.4

2.7

2.5

Robbery

Assault

Aggravated assault

Simple assault

Domestic violence

Intimate partner violence

Stranger violence

Violent crime involving injury

Serious violent crime

Serious domestic violence

Serious intimate partner violence

Serious stranger violence

Serious violent crime involving weapons

Serious violent crime involving injury

property crime

Burglary

Motor vehicle theft

Theft

138,840

64,865

117,267

52,830

38,717

96,462

76,496

75,908

27,168

19,820

48,951

40,598

68,275

281,630

87,419

45,512

247,181

number of victims

40,720

115,293

47,661

96,920

42,670

32,782

86,340

55,014

73,550

30,868

22,113

52,804

39,659

57,560

245,281

88,603

33,926

222,918

29,812

101,859

42,550

87,665

39,050

32,601

67,935

52,850

56,271

24,777

21,793

38,991

36,693

46,741

228,264

95,066

41,791

196,644

0.01

0.05

0.03

0.04

0.02

0.02

0.04

0.03

0.03

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.03

0.02

0.20

0.07

prevalence rate

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

0.02

0.04

0.02

0.04

0.02

0.01

0.03

0.02

0.03

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.02

0.01

0.18

0.07

2013

Violent crime

Rape/sexual assault

150,092

19,002

36,110

127,219

23,675

108,609

22,303

0.06

0.01

0.05

0.01

0.04

0.01

0.01

0.04

0.02

0.03

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.02

0.02

0.01

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.01

0.16

0.07

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

0.04 0.03 0.16 0.16

0.03 0.14

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014

15

appendix Table 6

Standard errors for table 5: Prevalence of violent crime, by victim demographic characteristics, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Victim demographic characteristic 2004

total 150,092 Sex

Male 105,919

Female 79,511

race/Hispanic origin

White 131,463

number of victims

2012 2013

127,219 108,609

89,178 75,546 74,399 69,052

102,270 79,807 47,275 45,957 51,330 540,126 10,055 10,862 20,617 13,203 12,907 19,063

46,254 48,894 57,127 45,943 44,946 42,661 51,770 50,074 40,036 44,940 18,295 17,124

89,105 77,364 53,346 39,954 13,545 16,037 36,941 37,796 19,509 23,127

prevalence rate

2004 2012

0.06 0.05

0.08 0.07 0.06 0.05

0.07 0.06 0.16 0.14 0.10 0.11 0.76 0.76 0.12 0.16 0.87 0.41

0.18 0.18 0.21 0.17 0.13 0.11 0.09 0.08 0.06 0.07 0.04 0.04

0.12 0.09 0.05 0.04 0.07 0.09 0.16 0.14 0.49 0.37

2013

0.04

0.06 0.05

0.05 0.14 0.09 0.74 0.10 0.55

0.19 0.14 0.10 0.08 0.07 0.04

0.08 0.03 0.11 0.14 0.44

Black/African American
Hispanic/Latino
American Indian/Alaska Native Asian/Native Hawaiian/other Paci c Islander Two or more races

age

12–17 18–24 25–34 35–49 50–64
65 or older

marital status

Never married
Married 59,349 Widowed 10,380 Divorced 36,582 Separated 24,088

47,183 30,771 9,551 12,515 16,757

47,503 58,908 57,588 61,191 31,243 12,528

100,724

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

appendix Table 7

Standard errors for table 6: Percent of victimizations reported to police, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

type of crime

Violent crime

Rape/sexual assault Robbery
Assault

Aggravated assault Simple assault

Domestic violence
Intimate partner violence

Stranger violence
Violent crime involving injury

Serious violent crime

Serious domestic violence
Serious intimate partner violence

Serious stranger violence
Serious violent crime involving weapons Serious violent crime involving injury

property crime

Burglary
Motor vehicle theft Theft

2004 2012 2013

2.1% 2.1% 2.8% 6.1 5.7 6.5 4.9 4.8 5.4 2.2 2.3 2.9 3.4 4.2 4.8 2.4 2.4 3.0

3.6 4.0 4.7 4.0 4.7 5.3 2.9 3.0 3.9 3.2 3.6 4.2

3.0% 3.3% 4.0% 5.1 6.0 6.0 5.9 7.3 6.7 4.0 4.3 5.3 3.3 3.8 4.5 4.2 4.8 5.2

1.0% 0.8% 0.9% 1.9 1.7 1.8 2.2 3.1 3.2 1.0 0.8 0.9

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014

16

appendix Table 8

Standard errors for table 7: Rates of victimizations reported and not reported to police, by type of crime, 2004, 2012 and 2013

reported to police

not reported to police

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

Violent crime

1.0

0.9

1.1

1.0

1.0

1.2

Rape/sexual assault

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

Robbery

0.9

0.2

0.3

0.9

0.2

0.2

Assault

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.9

0.9

1.1

Aggravated assault

0.4

0.3

0.4

0.2

0.2

0.2

Simple assault

0.7

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.8

1.0

Domestic violence

0.4

0.3

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.3

Intimate partner violence

0.3

0.2

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

Stranger violence

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

Violent crime involving injury

0.5

0.4

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.4

Serious violent crime

0.1

0.5

0.6

0.1

0.4

0.4

Serious domestic violence

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

Serious intimate partner violence

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

Serious stranger violence

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

Serious violent crime involving weapons

0.5

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.3

Serious violent crime involving injury

0.3

0.2

0.3

0.2

0.2

0.2

property crime

2.2

1.7

1.6

2.8

2.5

2.2

Burglary

0.9

0.8

0.8

0.8

0.7

0.7

Motor vehicle theft

0.6

0.4

0.4

0.2

0.2

0.2

Theft

1.7

1.2

1.2

2.6

2.3

2.0

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

appendix Table 9

Standard errors for table 8: Violent crime victims who received assistance from a victim service agency, by type of crime, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, 2013.

type of crime

2004

2012

2013

Violent crime

1.1%

1.0%

1.3%

Serious violent crime

1.8

1.7

2.3

Simple assault

1.2

1.1

1.3

Violent crime resulting in injury

2.2%

2.4%

2.8%

Violent crime involving weapon

1.9%

1.9%

1.9%

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 17

appendix Table 10

Standard errors for table 9: Violent victimization, by victim demographic characteristics, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Violent crime Serious violent crime

Victim demographic characteristic 2004

2012

2013 2004

2012

2013

total 1.3

1.2

1.6 0.7

0.6

0.7

Sex

Male 2.1

2.0

2.3 1.0

1.0

1.0

Female 1.8

1.7

2.2 0.9

0.7

1.0

race/Hispanic origin

White 1.8

1.7

2.0 0.8

0.7

0.9

Black/African American 3.2

3.4

3.5 2.2

1.7

1.8

Hispanic/Latino 2.4

2.6

3.2 1.2

1.4

1.4

American Indian/Alaska Native 27.7

13.3

15.2 14.2

9.7

12.2

Asian/Native Hawaiian/other Paci c Islander 2.5

3.0

1.9 1.4

2.1

0.7

Two or more races 15.1

9.1

15.5 5.2

3.9

7.3

age

12–17 4.5

4.6

6.1 2.0

1.7

2.1

18–24 4.7

3.9

4.3 2.5

2.1

2.0

25–34 2.9

3.1

3.6 1.5

1.5

1.7

35–49 2.3

2.5

2.5 1.2

1.2

1.2

50–64 1.7

1.6

2.4 0.9

0.8

1.2

65 or older 0.6

1.0

1.1 0.3

0.5

0.4

marital status

Never married 3.1

2.8

3.4 1.6

1.2

1.3

Married 1.2

1.2

1.3 0.6

0.5

0.6

Widowed 2.0

2.0

2.2 0.8

1.0

1.5

Divorced 4.0

3.9

4.6 2.0

1.8

2.7

Separated 12.8

11.1

11.9 7.0

7.3

7.2

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

appendix Table 11

Standard errors for table 10: Violent and property victimization, by household location, 2004, 2012, and 2013

Violent crime

Serious violent crime

property crime

Household location

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

2004

2012

2013

total

1.3

1.2

1.6

0.7

0.6

0.7

3.9

3.1

2.9

region

Northeast

2.1

2.5

3.3

1.2

0.9

1.4

5.4

4.9

4.3

Midwest

2.7

2.2

2.8

1.4

1.2

1.3

6.2

5.2

4.6

South

2.0

1.8

2.1

1.0

0.8

0.9

5.1

4.2

3.9

West

2.8

2.8

3.1

1.3

1.5

1.5

7.0

6.1

5.7

location of residence

Urban

2.8

2.4

2.7

1.5

1.2

1.3

6.4

4.9

4.7

Suburban

1.7

1.7

2.2

0.8

0.7

0.9

4.4

3.7

3.4

Rural

2.6

2.3

2.5

1.1

1.0

1.2

5.9

5.7

5.0

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 2004, 2012, and 2013.

Criminal ViCtimization, 2013 | September 2014 18

e Bureau of Justice Statistics of the U.S. Department of Justice is the principal federal agency responsible for measuring crime, criminal victimization, criminal o enders, victims of crime, correlates of crime, and the operation of criminal and civil justice systems at the federal, state, tribal, and local levels. BJS collects, analyzes, and disseminates reliable and valid statistics on crime and justice systems in the United States, supports improvements to state and local criminal justice information systems, and participates with national and international organizations to develop and recommend national standards for justice statistics. William J. Sabol is acting director.

is report was written by Jennifer L. Truman, Ph.D. and Lynn Langton, Ph.D. Erika Harrell veri ed the report.

Lockheed Martin, Jill omas, and Morgan Young edited the report. Barbara Quinn produced the report.

September 2014, NCJ 247648

O ce of Justice Programs Innovation • Partnerships • Safer Neighborhoods http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov

 

The above was copied.  The full original report is available at: http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/cv13.pdf

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

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