My Trip Back To Harlem 

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

10 thoughts on “My Trip Back To Harlem ”

  1. Looks like they picked up some of the garbage since the last time I visited. They had a strike in the 70’s and your shot of garbage bags on the sidewalk reminded me of that time. Looks great now, quite the contrast.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Believe it or not the elementary school I attended when I first came to this country was still there. Had to take a picture.

      I believe the trash schedule is less frequent in Harlem than other parts of Manhattan especially lower Manhattan where I never saw trash piles waiting to be picked up. You know I could tell a lot about NYC from riding the subway. Segregation is definitely alive and well in NYC.

      Like

      1. Hi again Angela. I enjoyed seeing this post and also thoughts on ISIS as compared to equally oppressive forces in America, aligned with the American military and government.
        I am now dividing my time between my rural abode in the countryside of southwest England, and Bristol city which many see as ‘the capital of southwest England’. Bristol was built on slavery, and to this day there are huge differences in wealth between richer (mainly white) neighbourhoods, and poorer (including black and ethnic minority) neighbourhoods. The other day I was sat in St Paul’s Learning Cafe. St Paul’s is a multicultural area of Bristol. It is quite poor. As I saw many black faces I reflected on how white my upbringing has been. Why is it that the southwest of England is mainly white, when there are plenty of non-white people in the cities? In turbulent times, access to the land, to grow our own food, will be crucial -all over the world. It makes sense that caucasion people in the southwest of England make strong links with multiracial groups in cities NOW, as later, when the food in the cities could run out, the last thing we want is for competition over natural resources to be aggravated by race.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Hi there, I would love to visit England again and see more of it. I was only in London. Returning to Harlem brought back so many memories. Coming home from parties, I walked 10-12 blocks from the subway alone in the wee hours of the morning and no one bothered me. Isn’t that amazing?

          Competition over natural resources, pitting the races against each other happens now but disguised so we don’t notice. Take Palestine and how Israel controls their access to the basic necessities, giving them just enough to survive and keep them on edge, in constant turmoil. Take the south side of Chicago where residents live in open air prisons and lack access to safety and healthy foods.

          Most ethnic groups don’t mix even when they live next to each other. And housing discrimination, a weapon of structural racism, ensures we remain divided and therefore easy to control.

          Great comment! What should I call you?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Hi Angela, thanks so much. Yes, you are right. I see your point. Your response is fascinating and informative. My real name is Matthew. I know I should get a photo on my blog at some point so that folk can see who they are talking to. I don’t know if you use Facebook but on FB I am Matthew Penn Leveret; with a picture of Earth. (The author in the picture is not me! She is Ursula Le Guin). But down the left hand side of my profile there should be a couple of old photos of me, if you want to see what I look like -if that’s important to you. I’m 38. I want to ask you -would you collaborate with me on something a bit later? It hasn’t happened yet, but when I have 13 engaged WordPress followers for my blog (not necessarily the first 13!) I want to facilitate / co-create with them a communal story of hope, edited by me, which I will then put on my site (and others can put on their sites too). Solidarity. 13 is the important number because symbol of the feminine and 13 moons in a year. I seek 7 of my first 13 WP followers to be female and also at least 7 to be non-white (although I am white). I hope you will be interested in this later. Yours is an important voice.

            Liked by 1 person

              1. Will do. It will be a while, and will require very little from you except a desire for justice and a little imagination. It won’t take much time. Meanwhile, I’ll follow your blog with great interest. Cheers. 🙂

                Liked by 1 person

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