Personal Story of Head Injury: A Story Without A Title

The Brain and Trauma

Lately, I question everything I do because I forget. You see, in 2012, I suffered severe head trauma that doctors missed. Since then, I had several hypertensive crises and mini-strokes with residual weakness. The first stroke, two months  after the head injury was because doctors continued the meds that raised my blood pressure and caused the head injury.

In 2017, a neurologist finally diagnosed my symptoms as  classic head trauma.  Before that, I carried a diagnosis of “abnormal behavior,” PTSD and HTN. Little mention of the hypertensive crisis or stroke which I think my PCP at that time did not believe was real. I had to change doctors to get the care I needed. In July, I will meet with a brain trauma specialist who I hope will help me.

What was it like to live with undiagnosed brain injury? Painful, very traumatic and destructive to my life and relationships. In the early days after the head injury, I woke up and often forgot to get out of bed. Or I would get out of bed and sit in a chair by the window for hours without moving. I would forget to wash my face, bath, get dressed and even eat. Activities of daily living (ADLs) were challenging, and I was alone without help. Took me 3-5 times as long to do simple tasks.

I also dreaded going out in public because I didn’t want anyone to know I was different. Living in my head and overwhelming fatigue made me an invalid.

I knew something was wrong but couldn’t figure it out. Deep down I suspected brain injury but didn’t want it known. I feared it would be the end of my career and it was.

This post has no title because I’m not sure where it’s going. Maybe it’s an explanation for why I haven’t followed through on many stories or why I have imprisoned myself. Or perhaps it’s the beginning of my recovery.

Be patient  as this story slowly unfolds.  Last year, I was in an extremely dark place when I found a flashlight.

flashlight

Source of Images: Pinterest

Author: Angela Grant

I am a first generation Jamaican immigrant whose experiences and accomplishments were made possible by the courage, sacrifices and the heroic acts of many whose bodies have rotted away in unmarked graves. Those are my heroes. Their sacrifices and death paved the way for my children and I. Failure to Listen is a token of my eternal gratitude. Failure to Listen is a tribute those generations of unmarked graves occupied by people of all races whose ultimate sacrifice of life opened the door for me and others, THANK YOU. Failure to Listen https://failuretolisten.wordpress.com/ uses cultural lenses to appreciate and understand the relationships between current events and our values, beliefs and attitudes. Culture is everything without it we are nothing. Failure to Listen will take you on a journey to recognize the beauty of our differences as the seeds to creativity, innovation and resolving disparities. By sharing my personal and professional experiences, I hope to do justice to the perspectives of those who are rarely heard or listened to. This site is not to incite anger but rather to provoke thought. It is my hope that Failure to Listen will work to foster intergroup dialogues and motivate readers to step outside the box and get to know ALL PEOPLE. In the spirit of Martin Luther King, let's join hands and remember his famous speech about a dream... A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. -Margaret Mead

11 thoughts on “Personal Story of Head Injury: A Story Without A Title”

  1. I’m sorry to hear about your illness Angela! You had a lot of tragedy in your life. I know you are a strong lady, but do you attend some kind of support group? When you meet with your neurologist I’m hopeful between the two of you a diagnosis and treatment will happen. You’re in my thoughts and prays!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Ruddy. No the diagnosis was missed and I was misdiagnosed so I received no support until 2017 when I got therapy to develop strategies that would help my memory.

      Many of the symptoms sound like depression but they were not from depression. I had neuropsy testing.

      Like

  2. Leaving coming up with soothing, uplifting, mealy-mouthed, and comforting clichés to other people, tell me: Still moving to Africa? You do? Here’s some help…………………..

    https://www.africanexponent.com/post/7764-top-10-cheapest-african-countries-to-live-or-retire
    http://atlantablackstar.com/2014/01/17/8-best-places-black-people-live/

    And in case you leave Africa for what it is……………….
    https://www.theroot.com/5-places-black-people-can-move-to-when-they-ve-had-enou-1790860514

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Andreas. As you know healing is not linear and I still have a long road ahead. Part of it is re-learning good habits to replace the bad ones I developed when I didn’t know what the hell I was doing.

      Liked by 1 person

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