ICE Raids: Know Your Rights guide

Know Your Rights guide

The ACLU sent the following email which they want to share so victims of Trump’s administration inhuman immigration policy will know their rights.   Following in the footsteps of Nazis, ICE plans to raid several cities on Sunday (tomorrow) looking to cause more harm to immigrant families by placing women and children in American concentration camps.

A new wave of ICE arrests is expected to begin this Sunday in at least 10 cities across the country. We’re fighting back by suing to stop mass deportations of refugee families. Here’s what you can do to fight back in your community:

Share our multilingual Know Your Rights guide on Facebook and Twitter. Everybody should know that we have rights that ICE cannot violate.

Share this know your rights guide now.

Know this: We don’t have to open the door if ICE comes knocking. If the agents don’t have a warrant signed by a judge, then we can refuse to let them in. We have the right to remain silent. And we shouldn’t sign anything before speaking to a lawyer.

ICE raids are nothing new. But for over two years now, the Trump administration has been terrorizing our communities at a new level – tearing thousands of families apart, spreading fear and hate. If this isn’t the kind of country we want to live in, then we must keep fighting to defend our communities.

The best way to fight back? Know your rights. And help your family, friends, and neighbors to know theirs.

Spread the word on Facebook and Twitter so we all know what to do if ICE shows up. Our communities are diverse, so we’ve translated our guide to 8 languages that encompass most of the undocumented population.

Thanks for taking action,

The ACLU Team

 

Law enforcement asks about my immigration status

How to reduce risk to yourself

  • Stay calm. Don’t run, argue, resist, or obstruct the officer, even if you believe your rights are being violated. Keep your hands where police can see them.
  • Don’t lie about your status or provide false documents.

Your rights

  • You have the right to remain silent and do not have to discuss your immigration or citizenship status with police, immigration agents, or other officials. Anything you tell an officer can later be used against you in immigration court.
  • If you are not a U.S. citizen and an immigration agent requests your immigration papers, you must show them if you have them with you.
  • If an immigration agent asks if they can search you, you have the right to say no. Agents do not have the right to search you or your belongings without your consent or probable cause.
  • If you’re over 18, carry your papers with you at all times. If you don’t have them, tell the officer that you want to remain silent, or that you want to consult a lawyer before answering any questions.

What to do in such an encounter

  • In some states, you must provide your name to law enforcement if you are stopped and told to identify yourself. But even if you give your name, you don’t have to answer other questions.
  • If you are driving and are pulled over, the officer can require you to show your license, vehicle registration and proof of insurance, but you don’t have to answer questions about your immigration status.
  • Customs officers can ask about your immigration status when entering or leaving the country. If you are a lawful permanent resident (LPR) who has maintained your status, you only have to answer questions establishing your identity and permanent residency. Refusal to answer other questions will likely cause delay, but officials may not deny you entry into the United States for failure to answer other questions. If you are a non-citizen visa holder, you may be denied entry into the U.S. if you refuse to answer officers’ questions.

Additional resources

4 thoughts on “ICE Raids: Know Your Rights guide

    1. Thank you, but I didn’t do much. It’s surreal that this is happening in America, the land of the free. I just read an article about parents making legal arrangements to have children live with family or friends in case the parents are deported. The psychological trauma of rounding up people who made a life here and separating children, then placing them in concentration camps is chilling.

      ICE will come prepared with ruses to trick people into opening their doors to them. Critical that those targeted understand this. There is mention of collateral arrests of people on the scene

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