Sign Petition To Disbar Aaron Schlossberg

Aaron Schlossberg is no professional. Not only should he be disbarred any case he touched should be reviewed.  Let’s inundate NY with petitions to disbar him.  (How to Complain About Lawyers and Judges in New York CityDisbarment)

The following is a petition to disbar Aaron Schlossberg:

I’m Ronen Kauffman, a fellow MoveOn member, and I started a petition after seeing some absolutely despicable video footage of a racist and xenophobic lawyer in New York City cursing at, threatening, and otherwise berating members of the public on multiple occasions.1

Sign the petition demanding the New York State Unified Court System investigate and disbar Aaron Schollberg for his unprofessional, unethical conduct.

Aaron Schlossberg was caught on camera multiple times making hateful, racist comments to complete strangers. His unethical and dangerous conduct makes it clear that he is not fit to be a credentialed lawyer. He must be investigated and disbarred.

Sign Ronen’s petition

Schlossberg is on camera yelling at women for speaking Spanish and says that they should be “kicked out of my country.” Another video shows him yelling at a couple on the street, “I’m a citizen here. You’re not. You’re an ugly, f***ing foreigner, so f**k you!”2

It should come as no surprise that Schlossberg donated hundreds of dollars to the Trump campaign and is now apparently one of the many bigots emboldened by the administration’s racist and xenophobic agenda.3

Sign my petition now to demand a full investigation into Schlossberg’s racist and xenophobic history and for him to be disbarred, so that he can no longer practice law.

Thanks!

–Ronen Kauffman

Sources:

1. “New York attorney in racist rant has history of confrontations,” CNN, May 17, 2018

https://act.moveon.org/go/39600?t=17&akid=207008%2E27882242%2EqScSBF

2. Ibid.

3. “Lawyer who threatened to call ICE about Spanish speakers is now target of complaint,” The Washington Post, May 17, 2018

https://act.moveon.org/go/39601?t=19&akid=207008%2E27882242%2EqScSBF

 

Source of image:  Pinterest

The Origins Of Color Prejudice

“The ORIGINS of COLOR PREJUDICE”

The view of the 18-century Scottish philosopher David Hume was that Africa has no history, art or science. This myth implanted in religion and exploited, formed the foundation of color prejudice today. If not for Africa we human beings wouldn’t exist today.  According to anthropologists, the evidence is overwhelming that Africans inhabited much of our
the present-day continents.

We were Kemet, the original name for Egypt, and Nubia, which predated Egypt and is now Sudan. The earliest city of Ta Seti, which by historical accounts was a diverse community, was advanced politically and democratically.

Tacitus, a historian and senator from the first century Roman Empire, described western Britons that included Scotland as dark-skinned, swarthy and with curly hair. As late as 1773, David MacRitchie described the Moors of Scotland and confirmed Africans occupied every corner of the globe including Britain. The original Celtic priesthood were
Blacks.

Coins depicting Iberian Negroes found throughout Spain provide evidence of the Moors influence after ruling Spain for over seven hundred years. The Moors captured parts of Europe, Asia and the Middle East. It’s said one reason that little is known about the Dark Ages is it was a time when dark-skinned Africans dominated the world. The Dark Ages, also called the Early Middle Ages or Migration period, referred to a period in European history between AD 500-1000 (the time of the Moors and much warfare).

Today we have mapped the human genome and have not yet discovered racial genes. In other words, there is no known African-American gene, Asian gene, Latino gene, Arab gene or Jewish gene. Proximity to the sun can explain the phenotypes or physiognomy. As Africans moved farther away from the sun, their complexion and features changed to adapt to the surrounding environment. In ancient times, color prejudice was not toxic as it is today. It did not give other people the right to enslave or to deny access permanently. There was much mixing of the different physiognomies to form the spectrum of colors and features we see today.

In ancient times, ‘white supremacy’ was none existent. Aristotle did say, “Too black a hue marks the coward as witness Egyptians and Ethiopians: so also, does too white a complexion as you may see from women. So the hue that makes for courage must be intermediate between these extremes. A tawny color indicates a bold spirit as in lions, but too ruddy a hue makes a rogue.” The ancient Greeks felt the most desirable color was a dark brunette or mulatto. (1) The Greeks thought physicalstrength and muscles showed better in a dark skin than a fair one. In ancient India, the Brahmins agreed with the Greeks that neither a very fair skin nor a very dark one was desirable. Recorded in the
Karma Sutra love precepts is the belief that very white and black women were not to be enjoyed.

The so-called science of Physiognomy that used physical traits to rank individuals, became very strong among Whites and charlatans, that in 1743 the British Parliament outlawed it. While these laws reduced the impact of this pseudo-science in Europe, it did not affect American colonies.

During this time it was considered almost a sin not to be a Christian. The Bible served as the authority for the colonists where the story of Ham that came from Jewish legends was used to justify colonist slavery as an order from God to enslave and punish Blacks. It was around that time we had a doctrine of Negro inferiority that was widely supported by the greats such as Voltaire. He believed only a blind man would think such nonsense as White men being descendants of Africans. African features dissected under the jaded auspices of inferiority beliefs.

In 1520, a Swiss physician Paracelsus (full name Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim), boldly declared that Africans could not have descended from Adam. In 1591, Giordano Bruno proclaimed that no intelligent person could believe that Negroes and Jews had a common origin.

These ideologies formed the theory of plural origin that became the basis of ‘The Pre-Adamite’ theory by Isaac de la Peyrere in 1655. Peyrere used the Bible to show there were two creations of man. The Pre-Adamites were given dominion over the earth and every living thing. Man did not come into existence until God created Adam from the dust of the earth and later his companion Eve. According to Peyrere, Cain married a pre-Adamite (offsprings of Cain) which in Anglo-Saxon colonies were African or Black people.

Peyrere went as far as to say that the descendants of Adam and Eve were God’s chosen people, the Jews. His Pre-Adamite theory was felt to be heresy by Pope Alexander VIII; Peyrere imprisoned in the dungeon, solemnly renounced his belief the following year.

How did color prejudice begin? Why did David Hume and others of his day speak so ill of Africa? Why did they strip Africa of its great history?

Interestingly, before prejudice became focused on dark skin, there was much prejudice among Whites for different shades of white. That set in motion the pseudo-science of Physiognomy. Over time the pseudo-science was applied to the Black skin.

Truth is we do not know, but we look at the past to see when color prejudice started to impact humanity by dividing us. The primary source for this information is ‘Nature Knows No Color-Line’ by J A Rogers. When Africa and Europe were joined there is evidence in prehistoric times that Africans and Caucasians were intermixed the most and for the
longest. Africans inhabited much of what is known as Europe. Since the historical period, about eight thousand years ago, there is abundant evidence of intermixing. In colonial times, miscegenation was the law of the land with racial purity the desired goal.

For more information, see this
detailed and well-illustrated website: African Holocaust

http://africanholocaust.net/african-kingdoms/

1. The first recorded instance of color prejudice according to Rogers occurred over five thousand years ago when the Aryans invaded India, (in the valley of the Indus river) and found Black people called the Dasysus or Dasyus. The writings of the Aryans speak about Indra, the national god, hating the black skin so much that it “slew the flat-nosed barbarians” and blew the black skin far away. India’s caste system based on color with the word varna (caste) meaning color: Arya varna (white skin); Krishna varna (black skin).

The Aryans of India thought themselves superior to the darker complexion people of India who the Aryans derided for their physiognomy. However, the dark-skinned “barbarians” the Aryan legends refer to now known as Dravidians were a mighty civilization. Buddhism came from them. James Bird, historical researches on the Origins of the Buddhas (1847) wrote, “Buddhas of a black complexion are common in the Fresco
paintings of Ajunta and that of the Arishtanemi, or race of Vishnu, who is the twenty-second Jain saint described as black complexion on the authority of the Hemachandras vocabulary.” (pp 8)

“Godfrey Higgins said, “The religion of Buddha of India is well known to have been very ancient. In the most ancient temples scattered throughout Asia where his worship is yet continued he is found as yet with the flat face, thick lips and curly hair of the Negro. Several statues of his may be met in the Museum of the East India Company…
The religion of the Negro God is found in the ruins of his temples and other circumstances to have been spread over an immense extent of countries, even to the remotest parts of Britain and to have been professed by devotees, inconceivably numerous… That the Buddhists were Negroes the icons of their God clearly prove.” Anacalypsis, Vol 1, pp. 52, 1866. (4)

[For additional facts on the Negro Buddhas, together with pictures and the evolution of Christianity from the black Buddhas, see Sex and Race,Vol 1, pp. 265-8. 2nd ed. 1940]

2. The second evidence of color prejudice was found in Egypt. Gerald Massey, the most significant authority on ancient Egyptian lore, said, “On the monuments, the dark people are commonly called ‘the evil race of Kus” but when the Ethiopian element dominates the dark people retort by calling the light complexions, the pale, degraded race of Arvad.”

The prejudice in Egypt was not as intense as the prejudice in India, since Whites were not present in considerable numbers in Egypt until the Ptolemaic invasion third century BC. By then intermixing had gained firm roots reducing the prevalence of color prejudice.

3. The third instance, and probably the one that had the most pervasive
effect that still exists today, was found in rabbinical writings.
The early rabbis said that black skin was the result of a “curse” on Ham by Noah. The signs of this “curse”, said these rabbis, were “a black skin, misshapen lips, and twisted hair.”

The Bible said the “curse” was placed on Canaan, Ham’s son. However, the rabbis changed it and placed the curse directly on Ham as well as inserting color in the Bible. Rabbi Huja said he came forth from the Ark “black-skinned.”

Topinard, the French anthropologist, also thinks that the rabbis of the first century were the first to stress differences of race and color. Race as we now use it was unknown in ancient times. Aristotle (the Father of Natural History), and Hippocrates (the Father of Medicine) did not mention “race” though both studied anatomy and the then known varieties of the human race including Negroes.

The King James Bible of the 17th century does not mention race. Neither does the first English dictionary by Nathaniel Bailey in 1736 nor the second dictionary by Dr. Samuel Johnson in 1750.

According to Topinard, “In the first century when Christianity was beginning to seat itself in Rome, the doctrine of a separate creation of Blacks and Whites defended by the Babylonian rabbis and later by Emperor Julian.

St Augustine declared that no true Christian would doubt that all men, no matter what form, color or height were of the same protoplasmic origin. He believed that all humans, even “monsters” or freaks of nature, came from Adam or Noah’s sons.

This dispute resulted in monogenism (a single origin) for the human race and became a Christian doctrine where doubters paid the supreme penalty for disbelief.

So why did the rabbis make the “curse” on Ham a black skin? Next, to the Aryans, the ancient Hebrews were the most color-conscious. They were slaves to both the Egyptians and the Ethiopians after they established themselves in Palestine. Interestingly, these Israelites were described as dark skinned with Negroid features. After four centuries of intermixing the main difference between Hebrew and Egyptians was not racial but religious.

There is no evidence that ancient Hebrews were white. Legends and considerable evidence suggest they originated from Chalea where the inhabitants were Africans. The hypothesis is that the Hebrews forced to leave Africa moved north, became fairer skinned as they moved away from the sun and intermixed with fairer skinned individuals. The lighter they became, the more they felt superior to those who enslaved them, and thus to erase that history and take former captors’ land, the rabbis made up the curse of the black skin. The rabbis sought retribution and other cultures used this myth to their
political and economic advantage.

The rabbis put the “curse” on Ham and the “blessing” on Shrem by Noah. Shem and the sons of Shem were Hebrews (sons of Shem), enslaved by the Egyptians and the Ethiopians, were sons of Noah. According to the Masoretic version of the bible the curse was on Canaan, son of Ham. Canaan did not go with Ham but settled near his uncle Shem in Canaan also known as Palestine and where the Israelites settled. This was in Asia. Ham settled in Africa.

The rabbis knowing this were the first to exploit the Bible to support structural racism. In those days it was common practice to place a curse on a group to incite violence against that group. The Arabs who were ethnically related to the Hebrews, and had mostly African physiognomy also adopted their version of the Ham legend created by the rabbis.

Again, the curse was on Canaan, the son of Ham, not Ham as the rabbis wrote. This is important, because the land of Canaan was in the Middle East. Canaan settled in Canaan in the land of Shem where people were fairer in complexion. Ham settled in Africa where the people were dark-skinned. The purpose of the rabbinical myth was to curse of dark-skinned people by adding religious justification. The reason appeared to be both economic, political and historical erasure. This myth formed firm roots in colonial America.

4. “The fourth stage in the development of color prejudice” (4) occurred in
Rome in the first century AD, in the fight between Christianity and Paganism.
Pagan masters believed that humanity, regardless of color, was either Roman or Barbarian. Christianity, the new religion, believed that of one blood God made all people and men were brothers in Christ. Also, the earliest Christians pictured the Virgin Mary and Christ as black, both being an evolution of the worship of Isis and Horus which
was once familiar in Rome (pp 11)

It appears around the time of the Renaissance, racism as we know it, began to take shape in American colonialism. There was an intentional effort to rewrite history. Iconoclasm and the iconoclastic painted over many biblical and ancient images, changing the skin color and features from African to Anglo-Saxon. Fortunately, there were too many
to repaint them all. There are images where the faces are white, but the hands and fingers are black. It is said that both Russia and the Vatican house many original images that show African ancestry in leading roles in European countries.

With so much of history destroyed and intentionally altered, it is difficult to connect all the dots. However, there is enough evidence to show Africans once ruled the world. That may explain why White American slave owners supported laws that prevented Black people from learning to read or write. Slave owners separated children from their parents, husbands from wives. The goal was total brain washing of African slaves.

Today dark-skinned people are targets of discrimination and violence by all races. How did it begin? Based on my research color prejudice took root in religion, specifically the rabbinical writings.


Again, I am not a historian or an anthropologist. The above is based on literature research. Please share your thoughts, any corrections or interpretations, so we can connect the dots to know the truth. How can we evolve if our history is full of lies?

Part 1: The Ancestral History Of Black People

Source of Image: Pinterest


References:

  1. Bagley, Robert J. Apocrypha Audio Series. Narrated by Steve Cook.
  2. Buddha the African. http://essaysbyekowa.com/Black%20Buddha.htm
  3. Diop, Cheikh Anta. (1974) The African Origin Of Civilization. Chicago, Illinois: Lawrence Hill
  4. Rodgers, J. A. (1952) Nature Knows No Color-Line. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press
  5. Rodgers, J. A. (1968) Sex and Race. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press

If you found this interesting investigate further:
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Louisiana Prison Punishes Suicidal Inmates by Chaining Them Naked To Wooden Chairs

The new plantations where the unspeakable occurs daily. What one has to ask is the purpose of prison to torture and make sure prisoners never reintegrate into society? Or is it for men in uniform to become  master torturers?

United States Hypocrisy

Louisiana is the world’s highest incarcerator by both rate and population, and it appears the state’s prisons are going to the most extreme measures to ensure that it forever remains at the top. According to a recent class-action lawsuit, inmates in one of the state’s many overpopulated prison warehouses who should be so unfortunate as to have thought about or attempted suicide are being punished for their attempts by being chained to wooden chairs, placed in solitary confinement for years at a time, and exposed to extremely cold weather by their overseers.

Angola Louisiana prison modern day slaveryAt David Wade Correctional Center in Homer, which houses a population of about 1,244,“prisoners who ask for mental health care instead are placed in suicide watch, stripped of their clothing and held in solitary confinement on a disciplinary tier for weeks.” From there it only gets worse. According to The Advocate, “Prison staff members respond to symptoms of…

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FFT: When Humor Hurts A Friend

Food for thought inspired by a silly FB post.  I learned that conflict is an opportunity for growth.   I also learned  culture matters.

Most saw the humor in the post, but others outraged that I offended Melania’s honor made such a comment:

I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw this. I never expected you could post shit like this. You’ve lowered yourself now to the level of people you question and totally reject. Shame on you.

“When they go low, we go high” Remember that one?

Being a thoughtful person, I saw an opportunity to manage offended people. Without conflict, there is no growth, right? Believe you me, I don’t usually think like this, but I did this time.

When a post offends a friend, how do you manage the fallout? Should you delete the post not to risk hurting or losing friends? I’d like to hear your thoughts since I didn’t manage this one well.

Once I sensed conflict I wanted to understand why someone would get upset over a meme-tweet of a person they never met? And whose husband was the élite pussy grabber who proudly coined the term for himself?  Trump inspired the tweet and my FB post. Responses of friends mystified me, considering it is near damn impossible not to make fun of Trump and his family.

This was an example where culture matters.

When Obama was President, I saw countless derogatory images, memes, and tweets of Michelle Obama on FB and Twitter.  Though hurtful, I didn’t take them personally.  Unlike Trump, Obama and his family did not tweet disparaging remarks about women, immigrants and disabled people.  Still, social media ridiculed the Obama family including their children.

Being told how wrong it was to criticize Melania, I thought of the innocent black men, women, and children humiliated and murdered daily.  How come friends showed no outrage or support for those innocent people?  My experience was a peek into culture and its multi-dimensional nature.

Next time a friend gets offended by humor or posts or tweets:

  • Ask why the topic is important to them
  • That will give insight into motive
  • Knowing motive will help understand and predict behavior

Performing the above will ease tension, improve communication and hopefully outcome.  Imagine the impact on understanding  each other.

Most don’t see conflict as an opportunity for growth.

This post was edited on 5/14/2018

 

 

 

 

FFT: Could Fake News Help Us Unravel The Truth?

Food For Thought (FFT)

Today during a conversation about fake news with a friend, it occurred to me that instead of calling news we disagree with fake, we should presume all news and information are biased and embedded with lies. In the last decades, our sources of information and news ballooned, leading to disinformation and #fakenews becoming dominant forces of manipulation. We need the ability to accept any information–false or facts– then decide its veracity.

All fake stories have a basis in fact even if the only truth was the story was false. Why did some entity or someone create the #fake news? Gleaning motives for false news may prove invaluable in understanding society and ultimately lead to the truth that some want to avoid.

Perhaps, the solution to disinformation is to embrace it by understanding its motive as well as content. Such an approach to news could lead to a literate society with insight and understanding of each other and the world.  If you understood the motive for a story,  could you unravel the truth?

Who Decides The News

Source of image: Pinterest

Cambridge, MA: Police Brutality at Harvard University

This post is a copied and pasted letter found on  the website of  Harvard Black Law Students Association.

The letter is about police violence at Harvard.   Briefly, a naked Harvard black student was spotted on campus on April 13, 2018.  Harvard University Health  Services (HUHS) was called and turfed the call to Cambridge Police Department (CPD).

The cops arrived.  Three officers pinned the naked Harvard student to the ground, cuffed him and then proceeded to beat the hell out of him.  The Cambridge Police Department while violently assaulting the student prevented student witnesses from recording the incident. Later the officers issued a false report about the facts of the event.  They charged the student with indecent exposure, disorderly conduct, assault, and resisting arrest.  The letter is in response to the CPD false report.

This event occurred at Harvard in front of black law students and many other Harvard student witnesses.  The event was videotaped.

Notable Points: 1.  Had the student not been naked would he be alive?   The officers might have mistaken a pen in his hand for a weapon and killed him.

  1.  Harvard University Health Services should be aware of police violence towards people of color.   To call the cops on an innocent black student or a mentally ill student might be a death sentence.  He hadn’t threatened anyone and appeared to be in need  mental help.   Shouldn’t Harvard University Health Services be on the scene to help/protect the student?  Certainly, students pay enough to attend the prestigious Harvard University to feel protected.   #policebrutalityatHarvard
  2.  The student was naked, cuffed and pinned, why did the Cambridge police officers proceed to inflict violence on him.  Was it necessary?   How were they threatened?  A pool of blood remained in the street after he was transported by ambulance.

The letter from BLSA follows:

 

Police Brutality at Harvard, April 13, 2018

To:     The Harvard University Community and the Broader Cambridge and Boston Community

From:    Concerned Members of the Harvard Community

Date:    April 14, 2018 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Firstly, we recognize the broader political implications of this incident for all of our students, and the broader Boston community. However, out of respect for the privacy and needs of the victim and his family at this time, we are not contextualizing this event in the broader instances of police violence.

Secondly, we must address the incorrect reports of the Cambridge Police Department (CPD) released today. On the evening of April 13th, a number of our current Harvard Black Law Students Association (HBLSA) members and admitted students witnessed a brutal instance of police violence at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue and Waterhouse Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. A naked, unarmed Black man, stood still on the median at the center of Massachusetts Avenue across from Harvard-Epworth United Methodist Church. He was surrounded by at least four Cambridge Police Department (CPD) officers who, without provocation, lunged at him, tackled him and pinned him to the ground. While on the ground, at least one officer repeatedly punched the student in his torso as he screamed for help. The officers held him to the ground until paramedics arrived, placed him on a stretcher, and put him in the ambulance. A pool of blood remained on the pavement as the ambulance departed. Shortly thereafter, firefighters came and cleaned up the blood with bleach and water.

This victim of police violence happened to be a Harvard student. The University has ample resources that could have, and should have, been mobilized to come to the student’s aid prior to CPD getting involved. Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) were the first to be called for help prior to the arrival of CPD. Instead of sending staff to support the student, HUHS transferred callers to CPD, who then responded as police often do whether cameras are rolling or not — by failing to appropriately respond to the individual needs of the person concerned and resorting to violence unnecessarily and with impunity. By involving CPD, HUHS put this student at great risk of being killed by the police.

Again, we are interested in protecting the privacy of this victim of police violence. We ask that those who know the victim’s name not share it with others, that his name not be included in internal or external conversations about this incident and that, in response to this letter, our conversation be focused on the broader issues of police violence against Black and Brown people and the following demands, and not this particularized incident, which is a symptom of a larger, systemic problem.

For Harvard University, HUHS, and HUPD:

We demand that Harvard University create an internal crisis response team to support students, faculty, and staff that does not involve CPD.

We likewise will require support from the school, fellow students and our instructors to put pressure on the CPD for the following.

For the CPD:

We demand that the officers who assaulted this man while he was naked, fully subdued and bleeding on the ground be investigated and held accountable.

Additionally, we demand that CPD respect the rights of civilians recording police conduct. The CPD policy recognizes that ‘individuals have the right under the First Amendment to openly record police activity in public in a peaceful manner’ and that ‘[o]fficers shall not under any circumstances threaten, intimidate or otherwise discourage an individual from recording police officer enforcement of activities or operations, or intentionally block or obstruct cameras or recording devices . . . .’ It was clear to our Harvard BLSA members that CPD officers were not following these procedures. But for our members’ persistence in defying police attempts to obstruct videotaping this incident, there would be no record.

The conduct of the CPD on the evening of April 13, 2018 was unacceptable. We are reminded, as soon-to-be-graduates of an elite law school that we cannot protect our bodies with our degrees — and that is why we also call our current students and alumni to embrace these demands as inclusive to all Black people, not just Harvardians.

We imagine a world where the most marginalized people in our society are not subject to systematic violations of their bodily autonomy and civil rights, and the CPD has failed the Cambridge community in this regard.

For any further media inquiries regarding this response, please contact hblsapresident@gmail.com or 2017-2018 HBLSA President Jazzmin Carr (601.937.0665) and 2018-2019 HBLSA President Lauren Williams (631.942.5211).

Sincerely,

Concerned Members of the Harvard Community

Supreme Court: It’s Legal For Police Officers To Kill Americans When They FEEL Threatened

Some days it’s not worth getting out of bed. The news always seems terrible, and as a woman of color, I feel estranged from the greater society.

The stories I read are insane. This morning I read a story that the Supreme Court made it legal for trained cops to murder unarmed civilians if a cop feels threatened. Cops only need to utter the words without proof. Cops cannot be sued and officially have a license to murder innocent people by just uttering the phrase, ‘I felt threatened.’ Police officers are public servants trained and paid by tax dollars to protect and serve the public not themselves. Do you think the supreme court made the right decision in giving police officers the right to murder Americans at will?

Do you think self-defense can be employed to protect Americans against police violence?

How can an armed and trained cop feel threatened by a kid running away from him? How can an armed and trained cop feel threatened when they outnumber the suspect? Why are armed and trained cops mostly threatened by unarmed POC and not by armed whites?

If armed and trained cops can feel threatened by an unarmed black man, can you imagine how threatened an unarmed black man feels when he sees a cop? Can a black man who feels threatened by a white police officer murder him in self-defense? Wouldn’t that equal justice?