The War on Blacks!

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs was a successful war, but not on drugs. What the War on Drugs was successful at was imprisoning young black youths, removing them from schools and making schoolwork more challenging and frustrating for children who were already stigmatized.

Imprisoning children destroys families, by trapping them in a vicious cycle of poverty where they lose the constitutional right to vote, lose the ability to get an education (since they are denied access to federal financial aide for college), plus a history of imprisonment makes most decent paying jobs inaccessible to them. What a way to begin a life!

This has created a cycle of ex-convict and delinquent youths robbed of their “manhood” while imprisoned, trapping them in a world of violence, environmental toxins and isolation that inevitably leads to more violence, premature death, imprisonment, drugs and unfulfilled dreams.

Society does not recognize its role in this targeting of communities of color. Every time a black youth ventures outside his invisible fence of concentrated poverty, and gets harassed or murdered, it has a profound and pervasive impact. Perhaps this is why such news is not covered; only black-on-black crime is covered.

Until a few years ago, I had no idea of the magnitude of structural racism destroying families in communities of color. Blacks are 14-15% of the US population yet about a 1/3 of the prison population. This is not because Blacks are more violent, but rather because of racial profiling that targets them, especially while they drive or when in school.

Seen from the eyes of Black youths, the world is not a hospitable place. Black youths are viewed suspiciously and deemed criminals by society. Black youths and communities are aware of these beliefs.

Imagine Black youths out to have “fun”, yet can’t, because White adults stare, show fear at their presence, stare past them, clutch their handbags, follow them into a store and even arrest or murder them while buying perfectly legal items at a retail outlet.

How would you feel if your children shared such experiences?

Black youths cannot go to a convenience store without being accosted, followed or watched by store staff. Perhaps some of this suspicion is justified, but most is not.

Solution:

As adults show Black youths the same respect you show other youths: start with a genuine smile and be prepared to be amazed at the results.

Many children from communities of color lack exposure, making communication difficult. Definitions and non-verbal cues have different meanings for them.

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs legalized racial profiling in the minds of law enforcement officers and the justice departments. A brief review of articles noted in the US Citizens database gleaned many established and new observations. Granted, these observations are anecdotal; therefore these are areas for further investigation. Racial profiling targets Black persons, especially the youths. Racial profiling equals police harassment, with attendant police brutality and violence.

The magnitude of the devastation caused by the War on Drugs on communities of color added exponentially to the psychological trauma of slavery, chronic discrimination and an inferiority complex.

Many communities of color live in a state of dysthymia (chronic low-grade depression) with many folks feeling helpless and hopeless about the future. Many search for meaning through religion, others through gangs, and still others through living in isolation. Remember at least one in three families have a loved one in prison. That is disruptive and defeating.

The War on Drugs has resulted in mandatory sentencing of poor drug offenders. For example, possession of five grams of crack – a cheaper form of cocaine – carries a five-year sentence, while cocaine carries a five-year sentence if the equivalent of 5,000 grams is in a person’s possession. Similarly, stiff sentences apply to marijuana, which is now legal in a few states and has medicinal uses. Where did this all begin you might ask?

The War on Drugs started in the Richard Nixon era. The privatization of prisons took off with the Justice Department collaborating with private prisons after Bill Clinton reduced the budget for law enforcement and the Justice Department.

Since then, explosive growth in prison populations suggests that private prisons have successfully rounded up the criminals from the War of Drugs. However, that was not the case, as it was just a smokescreen of stereotypes. Closer inspection of data refutes that claim by the demonstration of disparities in the justice system and law enforcement.

Private prisons and the Justice Department have a lucrative partnership (paid for by taxpayers) that arrest targeted individuals despite known innocence. These innocent victims, usually challenged in self-defense, are subjected to repeated adult bullying by police officers, correctional officers, judges and prosecutors. They become the main pool or source of income for private prisons and judges.

One wonders if police officers and correctional officers are selected for their brutality and, perhaps, their affiliation with ‘White Supremacy’.

New York City charges about $168,000 per year for each prisoner. This sum does not include benefits and other essentials. New York City does well, considering the accommodations at Rikers. States get more taxpayer dollars to warehouse prisoners than they receive to help poor families. $168,000 a year! Let that sink in while absorbing the landscape of American police state.

Could the above serve as an incentive or driver behind the rise in incarceration rates and prison populations? The United States is 5% of the world’s population, yet it has 25% of the world’s prison population (that is 2.2 million prisoners).

If prisons are packed with low offenders, how is crime controlled?

“Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

My thoughts: Police officers take the easy way out to increase their statistics and make themselves look like crime fighters. However, police officers surreptitiously frame innocent victims while leaving gang members undisturbed to wreak fear and oppression in communities of color. #BlackonBlack Crimes

Police Officers choose victims rather than finding criminals.

Associate Editor’s comments: I share the same thoughts on the war on drugs as it too has ruined many families and communities that are White, Black and Hispanic. This especially true in the poor sections of cities and communities where all those races are targeted.

As a side note, the irony in all of this is that the Government created this mess early on in the Iran-Contra Affair, when the government willingly flooded Black neighborhoods with cocaine in order to fund Nicagua’s Manuel Noriega, which in turn spiked drug related arrests even more.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

Please share your thoughts… I am interested as I continue to do research.

Ferguson Cops Busted New Video ?

Ferguson Cops Busted? New Video Seems To Show Brown Paying For Cigarillos (Video)

http://crooksandliars.com/2014/08/ferguson-cops-busted-new-video-seems-show

 

The Ku Klux Klan and a growing group of angry white people are raising reward money for the murder of “typical low-IQ Negro” Michael Brown. Wilson is already on course to make tens of thousands of dollars for his deed.

 

Eric Garner’s Funeral: NYPD Impenitent

 

Calvin Bryant, a 53-year-old anti-police-violence activist who says he knew Garner growing up. Bryant was angry, and let the press know it as he stood with his cousin, Richard Kirkpatrick, and his two young children, holding a sign that read “# I Can’t Breath” and wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the face of Ramarley Graham, the Bronx teenager killed in his own home by police in 2012. “When is this going to stop?” Bryant asked reporters, clutching his shirt. “Ramarley Graham, this case ain’t been solved yet, and already you’ve got the nerve to kill this man Eric Garner.”

Calvin-Bryant-protecting-w-children

Why Did Police Arrest This Man in Front of His Kids at Eric Garner’s Funeral?

https://news.vice.com/article/why-did-police-arrest-this-man-in-front-of-his-kids-at-eric-garners-funeral?utm_source=vicenewstwitter

Garner Funeral where Calvin Bryant was arrested  in front of Children

Eric Garner’s Funeral:  NYPD Impenitent

As if to show the world their characters, culture of impenitence, and confident arrogance, NYPD officers harassed mourners and fabricated another arrest. This time, they arrested Calvin Bryant on an “outstanding warrant” and for “resisting arrest.”  They arrested this mourner at  Eric Garner’s funeral.    How do such actions by the NYPD ameliorate tension and build trust?

It’s déjà vu!  It’s sarcasm, but true:  How creative is the NYPD?   Why change a good lie when most Americans secretly approve, harbor biases, and don’t care? (smiles)

The NYPD continues unabated to terrorize communities of color. The video is extremely poignant and brought sorrowful tears as friends and neighbors mourning the loss of Eric Garner pleaded helplessly as another family member and neighbor was hauled away by the NYPD. Calvin Bryant, with his family–his children–exercised his First Amendment right to free speech (within federal laws) and was arrested by the NYPD.

Consider the obvious and this: NYPD created another household of children run by  single black women. What are the ramifications?  It’s interesting how  our government creates poverty through jobs and lucrative parasitic  opportunites for chosen businesses.

Why would the NYPD provoke a community that is in mourning, fearful, and mistrustful? Most black communities are disarmed because of arrest records. I believe this element was codified into a silent agreement.

NYPD’s boldness is amazing! They  are fearless of repercussions.   They are impenitent! In plain sight, NYPD  officers of the law fabricated the routine lies (resisting arrest–the outstanding arrest was  probably fabricated) with impunity and lack of accountability.   They harassed    a member of a community that is suffering,  rendered helpless but not broken,  and  mainstream media turned blind eyes looking for “the news.”   A few weeks ago, the same police department murdered Eric Garner. This was his funeral. His last words were, “Leave me alone. This stops today.” Then, he was murdered by Officer Daniel Pantaleo.   NYPD  displayed impenitence by ignoring  the dead man’s wishes at his funeral.

Why did NYPD arrest Calvin Bryant?

How many times was Calvin Bryant arrested by the NYPD? Eric Garner had 31 arrests. Another man was arrested over 200 times for trespassing at his place of employment–all dismissed. Interestingly, with that many arrests, Eric Garner’s only charge was possession of a joint, I think. There are so many stories with similar patterns,  I get confused.

In reviewing this pattern, it appeared the NYPD employed racial profiling to target black and Hispanic people along with other groups less equipped than whites to offer a defense or resistance.

In addition, there were monetary benefits linked to arrests that went directly to the NYPD and the judicial system. How can it cost NYC $168,000 per year to house a prisoner at Rikers? Who earns a salary of $168,000? How many of you would pay that much for accommodations at a correctional facility akin to Rikers? A fiscally responsible city such as NYC paid that much, which seems exorbitant and uncharacteristic, unless corruption and fraud were involved.

Another consideration is that NYPD is heavily armed now more than ever–thanks to FEMA and the Health and Human Services Department (HHS). NYPD is dangerous, totally unaccountable, and entirely above the law.

The NYPD’s reign of terror against communities of color continues undaunted, undeterred, and surprisingly emboldened. The recent homicide death of Eric Garner at the hands of Officer David Pantaleo, as well as other deaths, are still under investigation and with no arrests: Why should NYPD fear justice?

An abundance of evidence, but no arrests. Every day, American citizens are arrested based only on accusations and without substantiating evidence. Or, as has become a pattern, they are arrested based on the statements of an arresting police officer such as Daniel Pantaleo, without corroborating evidence and with an abundance of conflicting evidence.

NYPD used racial profiling to target American citizens in black and other communities. These citizens became targeted victims and were repeatedly arrested, delivering a steady stream of income and satisfaction akin to Sodom and Gomorrah. Groups targeted for incarceration have only two options: obey or die.

NYPD and justice departments deployed racial profiling as a strategy to increase stats and show Americans that our tax money was well-spent on the NYPD, a tough crime-fighting unit. (vomits)    (See Evidence-based Programs: Right Answers Wrong Questions.)

Do you think the NYPD is a tough  crime-fighting unit or a crime-creating unit?



#BoycottNYC!



  • Boycott NYC until the Officers  involved in #EricGarner murder are behind bars.
  •  Show Your Support.  
  • Everyone can participate 
  • And Send a POWERFUL message to government and the NYPD


What can YOU do?

-Attend no conferences in NYC– choose alternate locations for events.

-Shop outside of NYC.  

AVOID NYC

-Demand the  arrest of Officer Daniel Pantaleo without bail



NYPD serves and protects We, the people

Still investigating and no arrests and solid evidence of #Policebrutality are no longer acceptable responses

Some rightly say, “What is the point of arrests when justice will not be served in court? “

Let’s ensure justice is served

***

Updated 12/5/14:

Justice was not served! Instead, Daniel Pantaleo,  a #killercop is Free to kill again and molest black men.

NYPD, protected by the government’s expanded immunity against all crimes,  use Grand Juries to bypass laws. Grand Juries have morphed into a corrupt system where government official murder unarmed Americans with immunity, impunity and no accountability…Held in secret in the interest of National Security.

#BoycottNYC Now!

***



Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.  ~Martin Luther King Jr.






Other Important and Related Stories:

1.  Bystander killed in Calif. standoff

2.   After Eric Garner’s Death, Cops Still Won’t Do The Right Thing

https://news.vice.com/article/after-eric-garners-death-cops-still-wont-do-the-right-thing

3.   NYPD Is Now Bypassing Journalists to Write News Stories About Itself

https://news.vice.com/article/nypd-is-now-bypassing-journalists-to-write-news-stories-about-itself

4.  If Filming Cops is ‘Interference,’ It’s the Least We Can Do

https://news.vice.com/article/if-filming-cops-is-interference-its-the-least-we-can-do

5.  NYC’s yearly cost per inmate almost as expensive as Ivy League tuition

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/09/30/nyc-cost-per-inmate-almost-equals-ivy-league-education-expenses-tied-to-rikers/


Calvin-Bryant-protecting-w-children





Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. ~Martin Luther King Jr.



Other Important and Related Stories:

1. Bystander killed in Calif. standoff

2. After Eric Garner’s Death, Cops Still Won’t Do The Right Thing

https://news.vice.com/article/after-eric-garners-death-cops-still-wont-do-the-right-thing

3. NYPD Is Now Bypassing Journalists to Write News Stories About Itself

https://news.vice.com/article/nypd-is-now-bypassing-journalists-to-write-news-stories-about-itself

4. If Filming Cops is ‘Interference,’ It’s the Least We Can Do

https://news.vice.com/article/if-filming-cops-is-interference-its-the-least-we-can-do

5. NYC’s yearly cost per inmate almost as expensive as Ivy League tuition

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/09/30/nyc-cost-per-inmate-almost-equals-ivy-league-education-expenses-tied-to-rikers/

The Success of The War On Drugs on Education

The Success of The War On Drugs  on Education

Part 2 of Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform

 

Was the war on drugs successful? At one time, many believed that blacks were criminals, and I started to fear my own people. The power of the media in creating illusions should never be dismissed.

The war on drugs (WOD) neither reduced drug overdoses nor drug ingestion. WOD harmed innocent children and their families by depriving children of education and placing them in toxic environments (prisons) where they were physically abused and sexually molested (by the United States government).

Over sustained periods, violent environments lacking support produce toxic stress. Toxic stress is a well-established risk factor for both physical and mental illnesses; stress is a major factor underlying the pathology of chronic medical conditions.

Toxic stress compounds pre-existing risk factors in children, as much as four to six times over children with similar risk factors who are exposed to stress, but have supportive adult networks and are not exposed to prison.

Table 1 List of High Risk Behaviors

Risky behaviors include and are not limited to:

1.  Increased risk of drug and alcohol abuse;

2.  Increased risk of suicide;

3.  Increased risk of violence;

4.  Increased risk of sexual infections, pregnancy and molestation;

5.  Increased risk of homelessness;

6.  Increased risk of poverty;

7.  Increased risk of Mental Illness; and

8.  Increased risk of re-incarceration.

Again, I repeat: public schools are the main pipelines to prisons. School-to-prison pipelines are massive problems in communities of color. Zero tolerance, racial profiling, and school-to-prison policies relegate school discipline to prisons. Children who act out are considered difficult to teach, consuming scarce and valued time. What else can overworked teachers and educators working in understaffed schools do with children considered as “trouble-makers?”

Public schools and private prisons expose inner-city children with risk factors to distasteful mixtures of human depravity, bondage, and isolation, as well as unnecessary cruelty, violence, torture, sexual molestation, humiliation, physical abuse, and death. In the United States of America, children with behavioral issues are treated in prisons regardless of their age, diagnosis of mental illness, and lack of appropriate comprehensive evaluation. How effective has that been?

A study of 35,000 former Chicago public school students (4), completed by Anna Aizer of Brown University and Joseph Doyle Jr. of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, showed:

Unsurprisingly, going to jail as a kid has “strong negative effects” on a child’s chance to get an education. Youth that went to prison were 39 percentage points less likely to finish high school than other kids who were from the same neighborhood. Even young offenders who weren’t imprisoned were better off; they were thirteen percent more likely to finish high school than their incarcerated peers.

 

More surprisingly, given that prison is supposed to deter crime, going to jail also made kids more likely to offend again. Young offenders who were incarcerated were a staggering 67 percent more likely to be in jail (again) by the age of 25 than similar young offenders who didn’t go to prison. Moreover, a similar pattern held true for serious crimes. Aizer and Doyle found that incarcerated youths were more likely to commit “homicide, violent crime, property crime and drug crimes” than those that didn’t serve time.

These findings are particularly troubling given that kids are often sent to the criminal justice system for relatively minor offenses.

The prefrontal cortex of a child does not fully develop until around 25-30 years old. Incarcerating children for mistakes – such as drug possession or bullying – teaches the wrong lessons, stunts personal growth, and exponentially increases baseline risk factors for children. Prisons create more risk factors and ensure children fail by limiting their paths to one of darkness, without opportunities for light, often ever again.

Children cannot communicate their feelings as well as adults, so they do what children do best: act out.

Public schools, soon to be charter schools, are similar to private prisons, cataloguing children by name, rank, and future potential inmate ID. Public school pipelines to prison are well-funded, lucrative, and powerful alliances that exploit children, families, and communities by turning the lights off on brighter futures while damning innocent children to lives of deep psychological pain.

Are teachers and educators listening to their customers? What are children telling teachers and educators? Few teachers take time to listen or inquire, and we have few indicators to measure student satisfaction with education.

Are teachers better educators with children in prisons instead of classrooms? How can teachers and educators create positive school climates?

How much does the average inner city class size shrink due to imprisonment of students by the end of the year? What is the impact of these policies on other students?

A system of care approach that applies Big Data is a scalable and fully customizable model for making education relevant and appropriate, leading to healthy, productive children.

Our culturally diverse country makes one-sized education to fit all communities unpalatable and irrelevant for many cultures. A system of care approach empowers communities to set priorities around needs of children and their families while employing resources within the community.

A system of care approach is one of many collaborative approaches to education and metrics that empower communities through community participation and engagement.

Armed with Big Data, education and law enforcement will be more responsive to communities, which will be more informed… I hope.


 ***

References

  1.  What Is IDEA?

http://www.ncld.org/disability-advocacy/learn-ld-laws/idea/what-is-idea

  1.  What is a System of Care?

http://www.thefamilygateway.net/supports-services/system-of-care/what-is-a-system-of-care/

  1.  United States Citizens Justice Database 

https://failuretolisten.com/2014/07/01/united-states-affluenza-and-genocide-online-database/

  1.  STUDY: Throwing Kids In Jail Makes Crime Worse, Ruins Lives

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/06/17/2166481/study-throwing-kids-in-jail-makes-crime-worse-ruins-lives

  1. Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform  Part 1

 https://failuretolisten.com/2014/07/18/prison-reform-benefits-education-reform/

Law Enforcement Entrapment: Stings and Arrests Targeting Minorities, Muslims, Mentally Ill and OUR Children

 Daniel Pantaleo, the 8-year veteran NYPD cop accused of killing Eric Garner with a chokehold on Thursday, was stripped of his gun and badge by his ...
Daniel Pantaleo, the 8-year veteran NYPD cop accused of killing Eric Garner with a chokehold on Thursday, was stripped of his gun and badge by his …

NYPD Officer Who Allegedly Choked Eric Garner Has Already Cost City $30,000 For Unlawful Strip Search

 

New York- NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was caught on video putting 43-year-old Eric Garner in an apparent chokehold resulting in death last Thursday over suspicion of selling loose cigarettes, has already been named as defendant in two civil suits that alleged improper police conduct including lying and false arrest. Continue reading “Law Enforcement Entrapment: Stings and Arrests Targeting Minorities, Muslims, Mentally Ill and OUR Children”

A Staten Island Man Dead After Police Harassment and Brutality by NYPD

A Staten Island Man Dead After Police Harassment and Brutality by NYPD

Eric Garner Died After NYPD Put Him In A Chokehold, Slammed His Head On Ground During   Arrest [VIDEO] [with  unsubstantiated unilateral stories by the police (NYPD).  Stories disputed by  witnesses and  video.]

I can’t breathe, I can’t breathe!” Garner screamed six times and then went quiet. Paramedics were called to the scene.

“They jumped him and they were choking him. He was foaming at the mouth,” Orta told the Daily News. “And that’s it, he was done. The cops were saying, ‘No, he’s OK, he’s OK.” He wasn’t OK.”

Police accused Eric Garner (a man from Staten Island) of selling UNTAXED cigarettes; however a witness said the now murdered dead man, Eric Garner had just broken up a fight.  In the video, it is Eric Garner frustratingly pleads with officers to stop their harassment.   NYPD needs no more funding:  who gets arrested for selling illegal cigarettes?  What is an ‘illegal cigarette’?   Jails are overcrowded yet  NYPD harrassed and murdered a black man because he dared to stand up for his AMERICAN rights.

NYPD cover story of Eric Garner, murdered by NYPD, selling illegal cigarettes is so compelling to White Americans,  police harassment and brutality resulting in murder  were warranted in an arrest for selling illegal cigarettes.  That will be the finding of NYPD investigation of itself.

Eric Garner leaves behind a wife and  6 children reported Associated Press.

Garner, who was asthmatic, told police to let him breathe, but officers had him pinned to the ground and slammed his head.Garner, who was asthmatic, told police to let him breathe, but officers had him pinned to the ground and slammed his head.In the video, officers are seen putting the 43-year-old man in a chokehold and knocking him to the ground while he screamed that he couldn’t breathe.

Garner, who was asthmatic, told police to let him breathe, but officers had him pinned to the ground and slammed his head.

Appeared it was Eric’s time for imprisonment but he had enough of police harassment now he is DEAD!  Another black male needed for imprisonment by law  United States Law enforcement and Justice Departments to replace Eric Garner, deceased husband and father of six.

Suggestion to the Family of Eric Garner:  Forget the NYPD investigation of itself…nothing will come from it.   File  Civil Suits against the city of NY, the state of NY, NYPD and the individual officers for wrongful death.   Sue them each personally…when their names are listed in lawsuits…others may begin to take notice.

Start a legal defense fund; Get the NAACP involved and if they do not get involved let the people know.   {That is one organization where communication is unilateral and marked by the $ sign. Recently,  I have yet to speak to a live person at any level from that organization and that was not always the case.}

Full Story at  :  Eric Garner Died After NYPD Put Him In A Chokehold, Slammed His Head On Ground During Arrest [VIDEO]

Staten Island Man KILLED after NYPD Cop Puts Him In CHOKEHOLD For Breaking Up a FIGHT!!

Source for Related Stories:

United States Citizens Justice Database | Updated July 19

https://failuretolisten.com/2014/07/01/united-states-affluenza-and-genocide-online-database/

Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform | A System of Care

https://failuretolisten.com/2014/07/23/prison-reform-benefits-education-reform-part-2/

 

Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform

The above images are victims of organized partnerships  involving law enforcement, the justice system (judges) and private prisons

Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform | Part 1

 

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs was a successful war, but not on drugs. The War on Drugs was successful at imprisoning young black youths, removing them from schools and making schoolwork more challenging and frustrating for children who were already stigmatized.

Furthermore, imprisoning children destroys families by trapping them in a vicious cycle of poverty as well as vicious organized corruption involving law enforcement and justice departments.

This has created a cycle of ex-convict and delinquent youths robbed of their “manhood” while imprisoned, combined with women of low self-esteem (another story), trapping them in a world protected by environment toxins that inevitably leads to premature death, imprisonment, drugs, or unfulfilled dreams.

Society does not recognize its role. Every time a black youth ventures outside his invisible fence of concentrated poverty and gets harassed or murdered it has a profound and pervasive impact. Perhaps this is why such news is not covered – only black-on-black crime is covered. Until a few months ago, I had no idea of the magnitude of structural racism destroying families in communities of color.

Seen from the eyes of black youths, the world is not a hospitable place. Black youths ‌are viewed suspiciously and deemed criminals by society. Black youths and communities are aware of these beliefs.

Imagine Black youths out to have FUN yet can’t because white adults stare, show fear at their presence, stare past them, clutch their handbags, follow them in the store and even arrest when item are legal.

How would you feel if your children shared such experiences?

Black youths cannot go to a convenience store without being accosted, followed or watched by store staff. Perhaps some of this suspicion is justified, but most is not.

Solution: As adults: Show black youths the same respect you show other youths – start with a genuine smile – and be prepared to be amazed at the results.

Many children from communities of color lack exposure, making communication difficult. Definitions and non-verbal cues have different meanings for them.

 

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs legalized racial profiling in the minds of police officers, law enforcement, and the justice department. A brief review of articles noted in the US Citizens database gleaned many established and new observations. Granted, these observations are anecdotal; therefore, these are areas for further investigation. Racial profiling targets black persons, especially black youths. Racial profiling equals police harassment, with attendant police brutality and violence.

The magnitude of the devastation caused by the war on drugs on communities of color added exponentially to the psychological trauma of slavery, chronic discrimination, and an inferiority complex.

Many communities of color live in a state of dysthymia or chronic low-grade depression with many folks feeling helpless and hopeless about the future. Many search for meaning through religion, others through gangs, and still others through living in isolation. Remember at least one in three families have a loved one in prison. That is disruptive and defeating.

The War on Drugs resulted in mandatory sentencing of poor drug offenders. For example, possession of five grams of crack – a cheaper form of cocaine – carries a five-year sentence, while cocaine carries a five-year sentence only if the equivalent of 5,000 grams of crack is in a person’s possession. Similarly, stiff sentences apply to marijuana, which is now legal in a few states and has medicinal uses.

The War on Drugs started in the Ronald Raegan era, and the privatization of prisons took off with the Justice Department collaborating with private prisons after Clinton reduced the budget for law enforcement and the Justice Department.

Since then, explosive growth in prison populations suggests that private prisons have successfully rounded up the criminals from the War of Drugs. However, that was not the case, and it was just a smokescreen of stereotypes. Closer inspection of data refutes that claim by the demonstration of disparities in the justice system and law enforcement.

Private prisons and the justice department have a lucrative partnership, paid for by taxpayers, as they arrest targeted individuals despite known innocence. These innocent victims, usually challenged in self-defense, are subjected to repeated adult bullying by police officers, correctional officers, judges, and prosecutors. They become the main pool or source of income for private prisons and judges.

One wonders if police officers and correctional officers are selected for their brutality and, perhaps, their affiliation with white supremacy.

NYC charges about $168,000 per year for each prisoner. This sum does not include benefits and other essentials. NYC does well, considering the accommodations at Rikers. States get more taxpayers’ dollars to warehouse prisoners than they get to help poor families. NYC get $168,000 a year for each prison. Let that sink in while absorbing the landscape of America the police state.

Could the above serve as an incentive or driver behind the rise in incarceration rates and prison populations? The United States is 5% of the world’s population, yet it has 25% of the world’s prison population—2.2 million prisoners.

If prisons are packed with low offenders, how is crime controlled?

Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful

Friedrich Nietzsche

My thoughts: Police officers take the easy way out to increase their stats and make themselves look like crime fighters; however, police officers surreptitiously frame innocent victims while leaving gang members undisturbed to wreak fear and oppression in communities of color. Police Officers choose victims rather than finding criminals.

Please share your thoughts… I am interested as I work on the database.

CHP-beating-with-test

Also please contact me by August 6 with feedback on the kickstarter campaign.

-Part 2 –

Prison Reform Benefits Education Reform | A System of Care Part 2

https://failuretolisten.com/2014/07/23/prison-reform-benefits-education-reform-part-2/