What is Black History Month?

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What is Black History Month?

The event grew out of “Negro History Week,” the brainchild of noted historian Black History Month grew out of Carter G. Woodson “Negro History Week,”

 in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week.”[1] This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthday of Abraham Lincoln on February 12 and of Frederick Douglass on February 14, both of which dates Black communities had celebrated together since the late 19th century.[1]

Since 1976,  the month of February has been officially designated Black History Month by every US President.   Other countries including Canada and the UK also celebrate a month of Black history
What is Black History Month?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_History_Month

Carter Woodson: Black History Month

Black History Month Carter_woodsonquote12

We do not show the Negro how to overcome segregation, but we teach him how to accept it as final and just. – Carter G. Woodson #quote

Lately, I am reminded of my blackness. I like it. I am bold, audacious and fair. My speech and syntax are different. My…

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The Mis-Education of African Americans

Quotes by Carter G. Woodson author of The Mis-Education of the Negro:

What we need is not a history of selected races or nations, but the history of the world void of national bias, race hate, and religious prejudice. – Carter G. Woodson

Philosophers have long conceded, however, that every man has two educators: ‘that which is given to him, and the other that which he gives himself. Of the two kinds the latter is by far the more desirable. Indeed all that is most worthy in man he must work out and conquer for himself. It is that which constitutes our real and best nourishment. What we are merely taught seldom nourishes the mind like that which we teach ourselves.   – Carter G. Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro #quote

At this moment, then, the Negroes must begin to do the very thing which they have been taught that they cannot do. – Carter G. Woodson

History shows that it does not matter who is in power or what revolutionary forces take over the government, those who have not learned to do for themselves and have to depend solely on others never obtain any more rights or privileges in the end than they had in the beginning. – Carter G. Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro

If the Negro in the ghetto must eternally be fed by the hand that pushes him into the ghetto, he will never become strong enough to get out of the ghetto. – Carter G. Woodson

The so-called modern education, with all its defects, however, does others so much more good than it does the Negro, because it has been worked out in conformity to the needs of those who have enslaved and oppressed weaker peoples. – Carter G. Woodson #quote

The mere imparting of information is not education. – Carter G. Woodson

The bondage of the Negro brought captive from Africa is one of the greatest dramas in history, and the writer who merely sees in that ordeal something to approve or condemn fails to understand the evolution of the human race.
– Carter G. Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro

If a race has no history, if it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. – Carter G. Woodson

No man knows what he can do until he tries. – Carter G. Woodson, The Mis-Education of the Negro

Let us banish fear. We have been in this mental state for three centuries. I am a radical. I am ready to act, if I can find brave men to help me. –  Carter G. Woodson #quote

Black History Month – Carter Woodson An Intellect

 

We do not show the Negro how to overcome segregation, but we teach him how to accept it as final and just. – Carter G. Woodson #quote

Lately, I am reminded of my blackness. I like it. I am bold, audacious and fair. My speech and syntax are different. My grammar is a mixture of American, British and Jamaican English, and it is not perfect, but it is my culture.

My strength amazes but my wit, intelligence, and plain-old common sense, are phenomenal.

I tell white folks a smidgeon of my background:

• some are amazed I survived,

• some are impressed with my accomplishments

• some think I am one of kind

• some think I should have severe mental illness given my stressful and traumatic personal history some even think I have hysteria

• some even hate ….because that is who they are.

I tell black folks a smidgeon and more:

All shake their heads in understanding. Understanding of stressful and traumatic environments, places where black dignity, self-confidence, self-pride and community are continuously demolished, denigrated and humiliated. They all have experienced, the Black Experience of blatantly-overt and majority-witnessed abuses and injustices of discrimination at the hands of the greater society that does not care.

( There are significant number of progressives white and non-white folks. They understand the power of cultural diversity and the devastating damage of American history in black culture.)

This month is Black History month. #blackhistorymonth Started by historian Carter G. Woodson in 1826 as “Negro History Week,” the second week in February to coincide with the birthday of two great Human Rights Leaders: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas.

Why?

At the time of Negro History Week’s launch Carter Woodson argued teaching black history was essential to ‘ensure the physical and intellectual survival of race within the broader society:

 

“If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated. The American Indian left no continuous record. He did not appreciate the value of tradition; and where is he today? The Hebrew keenly appreciated the value of tradition, as is attested by the Bible itself. In spite of worldwide persecution, therefore, he is a great factor in our civilization.” Carter G. Woodson

In 1976, at the bicentennial celebration of this country, Negro History Week was expanded to a month. Seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.- President Gerald R. Ford

The differentness of races, moreover, is no evidence of superiority or of inferiority. This merely indicates that each race has certain gifts which the others do not possess. – Carter G. Woodson #quote

http://www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/about.html