Video: Saturday Night Live Hits Obama Hard on Handling of Ebola Crisis and Many Others

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/27/video-saturday-night-live-hits-obama-hard-on-handling-of-ebola-crisis-and-many-others/


WHO welcomes Swissmedic approval of Ebola vaccine trial at Lausanne University Hospital

http://who.int/mediacentre/news/statements/2014/swissmedic-ebola-vaccine/en/

 

The vaccine is based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus (“ChAd-Ebola”; Chimpanzee-Adenovirus chAD3-ZEBOV). The trial will test the safety of the vaccine and its capacity to induce an immune response. Results from the CHUV trial will – together with the results of other centres involved – provide the basis for planning subsequent trials involving several thousand participants, and for choosing vaccine dose-level for efficacy trials.




 

Ebola Shots on Lake Geneva for $845 Tests Vaccine Support

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-10-28/volunteers-will-test-ebola-virus-in-switzerland-for-845.html?hootPostID=564c68975675f6651fd0e57add1b1876

Lausanne, Switzerland,

The city will host the largest study for the leading experimental vaccine to fight Ebola, a key step in halting the outbreak. Though its sedate streets are far from the contagion in West Africa, the scientist leading the tests says he’s managed to find a first batch of willing participants — albeit mostly doctors and medical students.

 

While Genton says he’s found plenty of colleagues and medical students willing to volunteer, recruiting participants from the broader community may be more difficult. People who are randomized to receive either the experimental shot or a placebo receive 800 Swiss francs ($845) as reimbursement for their time and travel expenses.


Is the Tide Turning Against Ebola in Liberia?

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2014/10/28/reports_indicate_that_ebola_infections_are_down_in_parts_of_liberia_is_the.html?wpsrc=fol_tw

Local reports suggest that there have been fewer new infections and fewer deaths from Ebola in Liberia than in August and September.

Public health researcher Helen Epstein writes for the New York Review of Books:

In August, the streets of Monrovia were strewn with bodies and emergency Ebola clinics were turning away patients. Today, nearly half of the beds in those treatment units are empty. I’ve been here a week and have yet to see a single body in the street. Funeral directors say business is off by half.

Northern Lofa County, which borders Sierra Leone and was one of the hardest-hit areas, has seen three consecutive weeks of declines in the number of cases observed, according to the WHO.

All the same, we’re far from out of the woods in the fight against the disease that has already killed in the neighborhood of 5,000 people around the world. There have been no similar reports of drops in the other countries affected by Ebola. In fact, the number of cases has risen sharply in Western Sierra Leone this month. The disease also may have spread to yet another country—82 people in Mali who came in contact with a toddler who died of Ebola last week are currently being monitored for signs of the disease. The collateral damage from the outbreak—including the impact on the economies and political institutions of some of the world’s most fragile states and the setback in the fight against diseases like malaria—will continue to mount.


Transmission

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/transmission/index.html

When an infection does occur in humans, the virus can be spread in several ways to others. Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected fruit bats or primates (apes and monkeys)

Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. There is no evidence that mosquitos or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Only a few species of mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus.


Questions and Answers about Ebola and Pets

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/transmission/qas-pets.html

Can dogs get infected or sick with Ebola?

At this time, there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able to spread Ebola to people or other animals. Even in areas in Africa where Ebola is present, there have been no reports of dogs and cats becoming sick with Ebola. There is limited evidence that dogs become infected with Ebola virus, but there is no evidence that they develop disease.

Here in the United States, are our dogs and cats at risk of becoming sick with Ebola?

The risk of an Ebola outbreak affecting multiple people in the United States is very low. Therefore, the risk to pets is also very low, as they would have to come into contact with blood and body fluids of a person with Ebola. Even in areas in Africa where Ebola is present, there have been no reports of dogs and cats becoming sick with Ebola.

Can I get Ebola from my dog or cat?

At this time, there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able to spread Ebola to people or animals. The chances of a dog or cat being exposed to Ebola virus in the United States is very low as they would have to come into contact with blood and body fluids of a symptomatic person sick with Ebola.

Can my pet’s body, fur, or paws spread Ebola to a person?

We do not yet know whether or not a pet’s body, paws, or fur can pick up and spread Ebola to people or other animals. It is important to keep people and animals away from blood or body fluids of a person with symptoms of Ebola infection.

Australia instigates Ebola-prompted ban on travel from West Africa

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/28/world/asia/australia-immigration-policy-ebola/index.html?sr=tw102814australiaebola1130aVODtopLink

 

Telling Australia’s parliament during a question time session Monday that his ministry was currently “not processing any application from these (Ebola) affected countries,” he said that the government was also suspending its humanitarian program.

READ: New Jersey releases nurse quarantined in Ebola scare

He added that holders of permanent Australian visas based in these countries would be subject to a mandatory, three-week quarantine process prior to their departure. Visitors approved to travel to Australia will also face further screening and followup checks upon arrival.