“Demetrius’ mother told him to always keep his hands visible with interacting with police — but it didn’t spare him from being punched.”

<a href=”https://twitter.com/nbcnews/status/853038298293452800″>https://twitter.com/nbcnews/status/853038298293452800</a&gt;

The War on Blacks!

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs was a successful war, but not on drugs. What the War on Drugs was successful at was imprisoning young black youths, removing them from schools and making schoolwork more challenging and frustrating for children who were already stigmatized.

Imprisoning children destroys families, by trapping them in a vicious cycle of poverty where they lose the constitutional right to vote, lose the ability to get an education (since they are denied access to federal financial aide for college), plus a history of imprisonment makes most decent paying jobs inaccessible to them. What a way to begin a life!

This has created a cycle of ex-convict and delinquent youths robbed of their “manhood” while imprisoned, trapping them in a world of violence, environmental toxins and isolation that inevitably leads to more violence, premature death, imprisonment, drugs and unfulfilled dreams.

Society does not recognize its role in this targeting of communities of color. Every time a black youth ventures outside his invisible fence of concentrated poverty, and gets harassed or murdered, it has a profound and pervasive impact. Perhaps this is why such news is not covered; only black-on-black crime is covered.

Until a few years ago, I had no idea of the magnitude of structural racism destroying families in communities of color. Blacks are 14-15% of the US population yet about a 1/3 of the prison population. This is not because Blacks are more violent, but rather because of racial profiling that targets them, especially while they drive or when in school.

Seen from the eyes of Black youths, the world is not a hospitable place. Black youths are viewed suspiciously and deemed criminals by society. Black youths and communities are aware of these beliefs.

Imagine Black youths out to have “fun”, yet can’t, because White adults stare, show fear at their presence, stare past them, clutch their handbags, follow them into a store and even arrest or murder them while buying perfectly legal items at a retail outlet.

How would you feel if your children shared such experiences?

Black youths cannot go to a convenience store without being accosted, followed or watched by store staff. Perhaps some of this suspicion is justified, but most is not.

Solution:

As adults show Black youths the same respect you show other youths: start with a genuine smile and be prepared to be amazed at the results.

Many children from communities of color lack exposure, making communication difficult. Definitions and non-verbal cues have different meanings for them.

Was the War on Drugs Successful?

The War on Drugs legalized racial profiling in the minds of law enforcement officers and the justice departments. A brief review of articles noted in the US Citizens database gleaned many established and new observations. Granted, these observations are anecdotal; therefore these are areas for further investigation. Racial profiling targets Black persons, especially the youths. Racial profiling equals police harassment, with attendant police brutality and violence.

The magnitude of the devastation caused by the War on Drugs on communities of color added exponentially to the psychological trauma of slavery, chronic discrimination and an inferiority complex.

Many communities of color live in a state of dysthymia (chronic low-grade depression) with many folks feeling helpless and hopeless about the future. Many search for meaning through religion, others through gangs, and still others through living in isolation. Remember at least one in three families have a loved one in prison. That is disruptive and defeating.

The War on Drugs has resulted in mandatory sentencing of poor drug offenders. For example, possession of five grams of crack – a cheaper form of cocaine – carries a five-year sentence, while cocaine carries a five-year sentence if the equivalent of 5,000 grams is in a person’s possession. Similarly, stiff sentences apply to marijuana, which is now legal in a few states and has medicinal uses. Where did this all begin you might ask?

The War on Drugs started in the Richard Nixon era. The privatization of prisons took off with the Justice Department collaborating with private prisons after Bill Clinton reduced the budget for law enforcement and the Justice Department.

Since then, explosive growth in prison populations suggests that private prisons have successfully rounded up the criminals from the War of Drugs. However, that was not the case, as it was just a smokescreen of stereotypes. Closer inspection of data refutes that claim by the demonstration of disparities in the justice system and law enforcement.

Private prisons and the Justice Department have a lucrative partnership (paid for by taxpayers) that arrest targeted individuals despite known innocence. These innocent victims, usually challenged in self-defense, are subjected to repeated adult bullying by police officers, correctional officers, judges and prosecutors. They become the main pool or source of income for private prisons and judges.

One wonders if police officers and correctional officers are selected for their brutality and, perhaps, their affiliation with ‘White Supremacy’.

New York City charges about $168,000 per year for each prisoner. This sum does not include benefits and other essentials. New York City does well, considering the accommodations at Rikers. States get more taxpayer dollars to warehouse prisoners than they receive to help poor families. $168,000 a year! Let that sink in while absorbing the landscape of American police state.

Could the above serve as an incentive or driver behind the rise in incarceration rates and prison populations? The United States is 5% of the world’s population, yet it has 25% of the world’s prison population (that is 2.2 million prisoners).

If prisons are packed with low offenders, how is crime controlled?

“Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.” – Friedrich Nietzsche

My thoughts: Police officers take the easy way out to increase their statistics and make themselves look like crime fighters. However, police officers surreptitiously frame innocent victims while leaving gang members undisturbed to wreak fear and oppression in communities of color. #BlackonBlack Crimes

Police Officers choose victims rather than finding criminals.

Associate Editor’s comments: I share the same thoughts on the war on drugs as it too has ruined many families and communities that are White, Black and Hispanic. This especially true in the poor sections of cities and communities where all those races are targeted.

As a side note, the irony in all of this is that the Government created this mess early on in the Iran-Contra Affair, when the government willingly flooded Black neighborhoods with cocaine in order to fund Nicagua’s Manuel Noriega, which in turn spiked drug related arrests even more.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran%E2%80%93Contra_affair

Please share your thoughts… I am interested as I continue to do research.

Florida: Schizophrenic Man Boiled To Death By Guards NO CHARGES

Darren Rainey, 50, died while incarcerated at the Dade Correctional Institution.  He was serving a 2-year sentence for a victimless crime (possession of cocaine).  At the time of his death, he had only one month to go before his release.

Prison guards forced him to stand in a tiny shower stall while being blasted by scalding hot water, until his skin began to shrivel away from his body and he died.  Fellow inmates say he begged for his life before collapsing in the shower.

The Florida’s Department of Corrections consistently finds new cruel and imaginative punishments for prisoners — allegedly ranging from starvation diets to forcing prisoners to fight so the guards can place bets.

Full story:     Man cooked to death in scalding shower as punishment by prison guards<http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/darren-rainey/>

 

Former employees of Dade Correctional Institution in Homestead say mentally ill are being abused and mistreated. (Photo by Lonny Paul)

Florida:  Schizophrenic Man Boiled To Death By Guards NO CHARGES

The Florida Department of Corrections did not do an investigation because no autopsy was done at the time of Darren Rainey’s murder. What about witnesses?

According to reports this man was a schizophrenic who was incarcerated for possession of a small amount of cocaine (today drug addiction is seen as a medical problem and not a crime now that the complexion changed). He had a medical problem and did not deserve to die in this manner. He had mental illness, so what treatment did he receive? Scalding hot water when he defecated on himself!

This was simply outrageous. It came in the wake of the increasing exposure of police brutality and profit schemes around private prisons involving the judicial system. Yet, there was still no justice. Racial profiling schemes are built on the War on Drugs, and the ‘Broken Windows’ theory intentionally targets people of color, the homeless and the mentally ill.

Darren Rainey was the perfect target. A bullseye was written all over him by a corrupt justice system that labelled and condemned him to this evil fate. A fate that saw him tortured and murdered by prison guards without remorse or respect for humanity.

An oppressive air of slavery resides at Dade Correctional, where the inmates are at the hands of cruelty by their masters (aka prison guards). The article makes clear this correctional facility is notorious for its torture yet Florida decided that no investigation was necessary.

Almost two years passed at Dade Correctional Institution in Florida, where it appeared Darren Rainey was abused, tortured and humiliated regularly by prison guards. At this facility known for torture of inmates, this was routine.

On May 2014, Julie K. Brown of The Miami Herald wrote the first in a series of stories about violence and corruption at Dade CI and other prisons. She wrote that there had been constant accusations of poor treatment of mentally ill prisoners, poor conditions in the food preparation area, and other concerns.[5]<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dade_Correctional_Institution#cite_note-BrownbackinSpotlight-5>

In 2014 former Dade CI prisoner Harold Hempstead accused prison authorities of fatally torturing prisoner Darren Rainey <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Darren_Rainey>.

In July 2014 Mike Crews, the FDOC secretary, suspended the warden of the Dade Correctional Institution and put him on paid leave. Later that month Cummings was fired.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dade_Correctional_Institution

What Deterrents Are In Place to Prevent Such Abuses by Prison Guards?

There is the Constitution and there are laws; however there is no one to enforce them behind bars when the enforcers are the perpetrators.

Prison guards and law enforcement officers are always given the benefit of the doubt even when the evidence points to murder. In the case of Darren Rainey, none of the guards faced charges; they returned to duty. The case was reopened earlier this year and again no charges filed against the four correctional officers involved in the torture death of Mr Rainey. This happens too frequently where law enforcement officials are not charged for cold bloodied murder.

Murder is murder, and it shoukd have consequences, whether the criminal justice system wishes to acknowledge the crime or not.

Those prison guards are now more of a threat to inmates than ever before, because they got away with murder. As long as their crime is confined to the prison, society ignores it. But what about their families and friends? Aren’t they too at risk for domestic violence, child abuse and a life of suffering crime?

A murderer is a murderer even in uniform, and that person remains dangerous despite our justification and feigned ignorance.

Eventually, we become what we tolerate.

References:

  1. Protesters to Demand Rundle’s Resignation Today Over Darren Rainey’s Death<http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/darrenrainey-darren-rainey-protesters-to-demand-justice-rundles-resignation-today-9228377>

http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/darrenrainey-darren-rainey-protesters-to-demand-justice-rundles-resignation-today-9228377

  1. Innocent pedestrian attacked by police, framed with charges, imprisoned for 15 months<http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/ronald-jones/>

http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/ronald-jones/

  1. Miami Herald: Allegations Of Abuse Of Mentally-Ill In Florida Prison<http://fcir.org/2014/05/21/miami-herald-allegations-of-abuse-of-mentally-ill-in-florida-prison/>

http://fcir.org/2014/05/21/miami-herald-allegations-of-abuse-of-mentally-ill-in-florida-prison/

  1. Source of Lead: Amor Welcome to Daily Life and Living Blog!<http://dailylifeandliving.blogspot.com/>

 

 

Colin Kaepernick: How Can I Be Proud Of A Country That Oppresses People Like Me?

Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.  -Martin Luther King Jr.

 

If America wants respect, then it’s time for America to respect all its citizens.

Recently, Colin Kaepernick, the 49ers Quarterback, did not stand for the national anthem.

Why? To protest and call attention to dead Black people. The daily unnecessary and arbitrary killing of Black persons and other People of Color,  by police officers sworn to protect and serve all Americans.

Kaepernick said the murder and oppression of Black people were bigger  than football.

Kaepernick wished to call attention to a system of corruption, that not only affects Black sport players, but also their fans.

Murder is murder, right?  No, in the USA, it depends on the color of your skin, your religion,  and your wallet as well as your badge.

Football and other sports fans, and NFL executives, were up in arms. Many angrily protested how dare Colin Kaepernick exercise his constitutional rights? They called him a traitor. They said he insulted the men and women who fought for his freedom.

Yet those fans and NFL executives did not care about the message or the dead Black bodies. They were not interested in a dialogue about change in a system that elevates Whites by oppressing PoC.

For these so-called “patriots”, including news announcers, the message was unimportant because the system of structural racism (which is the foundation of America) is vital for the survival of white supremacy.

Some fans have called Kaepernick a hypocrite, as he has done very well by benefiting from the American Dream. Yet this includes freedom of expression, but fans and some NFL executives seem bent on denying and punishing Kaepernick for exercising his constitutional right.

Fortunately, many of those that really fought for our country’s freedom agree and support Kaepernick’s right and message.  #VeteransForKaepernick

U.S. Veterans Explain Why They’re Standing With Colin Kaepernick:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/veterans-colin-kaepernick_us_57c71aafe4b078581f10ba24

U.S. Veterans Are Coming To Colin Kaepernick’s Defense In Droves:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/veterans-for-kaepernick_us_57c6d704e4b0a22de09325f4

 

Hypocrisy And Double Standards

Then there was Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte who embarrassed his country by committing perjury, plus offending Brazilians. Yet once again, white Americans defended Mr Lochte’s right to conduct criminal activities, by saying he was only 30 years old, a kid who was drunk, to give him a break and make his extreme international embarrassment excusable.

Why? Because he has White privilege, the ultimate hypocrisy and double standard in America that is offensive to justice and getting stronger.

Contrast this with Gabby Douglas, the Black gold medalist Olympian gymnast, who was demonized for not smiling enough or placing her hand over her heart during the National Anthem. White Americans were more angry about her action than those of Ryan Lochte, whose motive was purely selfish and criminal.

There is a reason many Black athletes and other Americans may not want to acknowledge the national anthem. An anthem written by Francis Key Scott to celebrate the victory of Fort McHenry. An anthem that celebrates slavery and was written by a racist slave owner who believed blacks were sub-humans. Would you stand for a song that celebrates your oppression?

Where’s the debate on Francis Scott Key’s Slave-Holding Legacy? Smithsonian

http://buff.ly/2bVO7uj.

Slavery and the national anthem: The surprising history behind Colin Kaepernick’s protest. CNN

http://buff.ly/2bM1N7O

 

The American Dream For People Of Color

Black athletes are reminded they are products of the American dream because of their income, not their liberty,  their freedom or their protection under the American constitution.  A design that considers them second class citizens. One that respects their athletic skills and ability to entertain, but not them as human beings.

At any time, Colin Kaepernick, Gabby Douglas or any other Black celebrity athlete, entertainer or professional can be put in their places as second class citizens and terrorized into submission by police for no other reason but the color of their skin.

As NFL executives  support the Police to shoot first and ask questions later, the next hashtag could be one of their top Black NFL players who appeared to be threatening to a cop.  Why wouldn’t you too take sides and protect your team?

Disappointingly, the NFL executives short sightedness in not fighting for the rights and protection of their players, and Black fan base, make them part of the problem that stole millions of lives under false narratives. In 2015, at least 1,100 people were killed in police custody. As of September 2, 2016, 723 people were killed by police officers.

The Counted: people killed by police in the United States

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2015/jun/01/the-counted-police-killings-us-database#

Black athletes are unable to voice their concerns of the violence and discrimination that they, their family, friends and culture are subjected to on a daily basis.

Aren’t we all Americans with the same constitutional rights to the American Dream?  Or are we not as many White Americans and many brainwashed Blacks say?

 

Colin Kaepernick Protest

Kaepernick being biracial is deeply affected by police brutality, a violence without accountability or consequences.

Colin Kaepernick is a hero and role model. What he did was a simple gesture of brilliance. Whites may not have heard the message, but the overwhelming majority of People of Color heard and understood.

In his car, Colin Kaepernick knows he too could be stopped for not being White and subjected to demeaning, degrading and dehumanizing behaviors by police officers. Behaviors that could lead to  his imprisonment or even his death.

As Colin pointed out, this problem is bigger than football. I applaud him for risking his career, and life, to raise awareness and call attention to this growing epidemic crisis. Now other Black athletes need to join him and maybe America will finally listen. There are elephants in the room, and unless we stop ignoring them, this country will implode.

Colin Kaepernick is probably more patriotic than his critics because he expects more from this country. He believes this country can live up to its promises that all people are created equal and protected under the constitution.

Kaepernick protests the oppression and murder of people of color by police officers

Americans Want To Know About Hillary Clinton’s Health

Americans Want To Know About Hillary Clinton’s Health

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has what is known as ‘Decision Fatigue’, to the point of requiring the medication Provigil.

I had decision fatigue caused from chronic insomnia. It got so bad I left the practice of medicine, with me too being on Provigil to keep me awake.  I took it with an amphetamine-based medication, as pep pills, to function.

The problem with this medication was the pills had side effects, and when the side effects were worse than the problem, I had to stop the pep pills or risk death. Stopping was no easy matter, as my fatigue became worse on stopping the medication.

If Hillary Clinton has decision fatigue, that is symptomatic of an underlying illness for which the fatigue prevents her from functioning.

Provigil is indicated when fatigue interferes with daily functioning. At one point I could not drive, because I was falling asleep at the wheel, and this was on my pep pills. I was on both Provigil and Vyvanse when I had a syncopal episode (fainting) resulting in open multiple fractures of  my face and head injury.  The medications elevated my blood pressure.

I made the initial decision to leave medical practice and was never able to return because of decision fatigue.

You see, I put my patients’ health and my oath to do no harm before my need to make an income or to continue with my dream job. So shouldn’t Hillary put this country and Americans before her need for power and money?

If Hillary will be too tired to make decisions, who will make them for her? Should that person seek office? Decision fatigue affects more than one’s ability to make decisions, it also affects functional capacity, especially executive function.

Also, what medication side effects can we expect from Provigil? Is she on other pep pills? And what is the underlying illness causing Hillary’s decision fatigue?

Americans, and indeed other nationalities, need to be reassured that the person elected to the highest position is physically and mentally fit to make sound decisions.

What do you think? Please leave a comment below…

 

Related Article:

Clinton Emails Discuss Whether to Take Drug Used to Treat ‘Decision Fatigue’ http://m.sputniknews.com/us/20160824/1044573184/clinton-discuss-take-parkinson-decision-fatigue-drug

Here is a video from an anti-BLM racist that I actually like:  What’s Wrong with Hillary’s Health? | StateOfDaniel  #BlackLivesMatter

Should Police Officers Be First Responders For 911 Medical Calls

Mental Illness vs Terrorism

These days medical problems are  morphing into “national security” risks.

Muslims with mental illness, who commit violent acts, are diagnosed as ‘terrorists’ and their mental illness ignored. Black people with mental illness, who are a threat to themselves, maybe suicide, are now being killed by first responder cops who feel threatened by their color and illness.

So as more medical problems are misdiagnosed as national security risks, negative health outcomes increase.

What do we physicians do to honor the oath of doing no harm? By permitting first responders to harm mentally ill patients, we abandon our oath and add to poor outcomes and the mounting expense of healthcare.

Aren’t we the gatekeepers of healthcare? Shouldn’t we intervene when harm is done by those who are supposed to transport and help keep our patients healthy?

{I believe} There are no official statistics on the number of deaths or injuries caused by first responders.

Given the current environment, where cops ‘shoot to kill’ suicidal patients and those with flare ups of their mental illness, isn’t it time we track such?

If the medical community remains silent and blind to these egregious deviations in the standard of care, we will herald in a new era of medicine where harm is normal. A situation where medical error is the number one leading cause of death instead of a close third.

Lack of responsible oversight or statistics on LEO (Law Enforcement Officer) encounters with patients experiencing flare ups, or severe mental illness, has put patients at risk for death and worsening of their mental and physical ailments.

Simple interventions can go a long way. Straightforward respectful communication, on the part of first responders, can go a long way to averting bad outcomes.

Unfortunately, in most cases with bad outcomes, communication is poor. Attempts to get family members or friends involved, to de-escalate the situation, are now rarely sought.

Why? Is it better to just kill these patients who are in need of help?

Cops are first responders in the healthcare delivery system and as such should attempt to do no harm at all cost.  They chose to be police officers and are paid well for the service they are hired to perform.

Has the principle of mental illness care changed such that death by first responders is a more cost effective mode? Has imprisonment become a more secure environment for patients with mental illness? Where have all the State mental hospitals gone?

These are all problematic questions. We have a rise in mental and physical illnesses with poorer medical outcomes. And are we planning to exclude these patients from government statistics to make our health outcomes sound better than they actually are?

Misdiagnosing those with severe mental illness as terrorists, or threats to police security, leads to an escalation in problems. More power and money spent on law enforcement and less on effective treatment that could improve health outcomes.

Over 55 cents of each dollar goes to the DoD instead of money spent to better understand and treat people with mental illness humanely. We could target effective approaches to treat and de-escalate flare-ups so common in patients with severe mental illness.

Much debate has gone into First and Second Amendment rights. Let’s now face in earnest the reality around us.  A reality for which we have no metric or indicator to guide us when police officers administer inappropriate first responder care. A reality that unnecessarily mislabels patients and does harm when patients are treated as criminals.

I leave the reader with this last question: Should Police Officers be first responders for 911  medical calls?

Leave me your answer in the comments…

 

 

8 Step Guide To “Good” Traffic Stops

8 Step Guide to Good Traffic Stops

To  be proactive and avoid police brutality and violence, I share this video. Hopefully by following these eight steps, we can prevent unnecessary police violence and brutality of civilians who are stopped by police officers.

  1. Pull off to the right.
  2. Find a safe place to park.
  3. Both hands on the steering wheel, visible at all times.
  4. Do not exit your vehicle unless requested by the officer.
  5. Have a receptive attitude, even if you believe your rights are being violated.
  6. Respect and Respond, even if the officer’s attitude is demeaning, degrading and dehumanizing.
  7. Make no sudden movements without informing the officer.
  8. Report inappropriate behavior to the Office of Professional Standards, even if the office is controlled by the same officers who abused your rights.
    1. Get the officers’ name and badge number; or
    2. Car number located on the side of the police car; or
    3. B-tag located on top of the car.
    4. For unmarked cars get the license plate number

Remember you can call 911 and request a supervisor remain on the line with your during police stops.

Bystanders, please assist by recording the incident on your phone or camera. In your recording,  please make sure to include the license plate number, car number and B-tag  to assist in identification of the police officer.

I welcome readers to elaborate, share experiences and add to the above 8 steps.

9.  “Do not volunteer any information, only answer questions that pertain to the traffic stop.  (Anything you say WILL be used against you. For example: Where you’ve been, or where you’re going, is none of his business and immaterial to the traffic stop)”  by Onno Vocks

Updated 8/28/2016