DEVIL’S PUNCH BOWL: The Hidden History Of The Union Army

Devil's Punch Bowl

DEVIL’S PUNCH BOWL: The Hidden History Of The Union Army and The Civil War

Eventually the truth has a habit of coming out...

Here is another of those stories that was never taught in school and intentionally suppressed by MSM. Just when you thought you knew the bad guys, a little history is revealed to demonstrate you don’t.

The more knowledge gained about the history of slavery, and the general history of Black people, the more you will understand why our society is the way it is. Why the truth is a threat to national security? Why we are in the midst of an information war? Why Black people are needed for White America to prosper? This article is not going to answer those questions, however it will share tidbits of Black history not known to most that I hope we will build on over time as more readers share information and knowledge.

Black concentration camp built by the Union Army.
Black concentration camp built by the Union Army.

#EngagedE #BlackHistory

You think concentration camps started with the Nazis? Read on…

In the 1860’s, untold numbers of freed slaves were reportedly forced into American concentration camps as they made their way to freedom. They were rounded up and some were lynched, others killed, or many forced back into hard labor and subjected to torture. These contraband camps were hastily built next to Union army camps. Yes Union army! The same group of men who claimed to be fighting to free slaves in the name of humanity.

Did you know the Union army subjected the freed slaves to even worse than slavery? As if that could be fathomed.

Our official educators and the mainstream media have intentionally buried this story and very little detailed information is readily available on searching. This is not surprising as it casts the Union army in a new light, plus makes one re-evaluate the true motive for the Civil War instead of the fairy tale fed to our children in school.

These camps were in Natchez, Mississippi located in an area known as the Devil’s Punchbowl. Here, over 20,000 freed slaves died in this Union army concentration camp. These men, women and children not even given a proper burial. Shovels were left for the living to bury the bodies where they dropped. Can you imagine? Those bodies were buried in the camp where men, women and children lived.

Black people, overjoyed at being free at last, only to be forced into conditions worse than they had left. It was something none of them could have conceived. Thousands actually begged to return to slavery. No wonder some call this ‘The Black Holocaust’!

Obama allocated millions of dollars in reparations to Jewish survivors of The Holocaust. Will Black people get reparations for the suffering, torture and murder inflicted upon them by White America? Affirmative action was a quasi-reparation to Blacks for years of chronic discrimination in America. Today, the mere mention of the word is a source of deep resentment among Whites that spill over into suits about reverse discrimination. And that’s another story.

Next time you are asked to choose between Republicans and Democrats, remember the Union army’s role in building concentration camps for freed slaves and the Confederate army’s role in supporting slavery. Same coin, just two different sides. Don’t we see a bit of that today in the US Government?

Share #BlackHistory, educate and empower…

20K Blacks Died In Concentration Camp Called The Devil’s Punchbowl In Natchez, Mississippi:

7 Shameful Examples of Concentration Camps Created for Black People

 

Source of post: DEVIL’S PUNCH BOWL: The Hidden History Of The Union Army at Engaged Environments

Source of Images:  Atlanta Black Star , Twitter and Pinterest

18 thoughts on “DEVIL’S PUNCH BOWL: The Hidden History Of The Union Army”

  1. That was a great article. Also, major props for using that Advise Show video. That’s how I first heard of that event.

    The Ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus one said “The first casualty of war is the truth.” I feel that quote is apropos given the opening paragraphs.

    The Devil’s Punchbowl was one of the most heinous things kept hidden in our history. The former slaves being tortured so much that they begged to go back to the plantations is just unspeakable. When I realized these were Union soldiers engaging in this crime against humanity, my heart sank even more as it showed they were really no better than the Confederates. It really is two sides of the same coin.

    In addition to the hard labor, Black people were starved out as they were annexed from society. That disturbed me on so many levels because that also happened to Native Americans, but because I’ve seen this form of punishment shown as a good thing in a certain animated movie. One can say the former slaves didn’t belong in the circle of life as they were seen as hyenas that deserved to be starved out (that’s right, Disney fans. I SAID IT!). This situation needs to be learned from everyone. Unbelievable.

    Liked by 1 person

            1. That’s very good. I’m still learning about some of those subjects and then some. I’ve tried writing fiction as a child, but I shifted my focus to other subjects. I got back into writing fiction a few years ago because I was compelled to write that I wanted to show in fiction forms and also to work on a series that deconstruct various tropes associated with certain genres.

              Liked by 1 person

    1. Both US parties are the same coin just different sides. To have a democracy we need at least a second party that is different ideologically and reflects the will of the people. Both parties support racism, one is overt while the other is nuanced.

      Funny you should bring up cartoons. The messages fed to kids by Disney and others ensure stereotypes and racism live on.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I certainly agree. The methods and some ideologies may differ depending on the subject, but the end goal is the same.

        Oh, yeah. I wasn’t aware of it at first when I was a kid that watched a ton of cartoons, but when I grew up I noticed some racist implications in movies. It also bothers me when adults who still watch Disney or Dreamworks movies and whatnot who deny such implications or complain that “It’s just a movie!” while making excuses for what they watch. Don’t get me wrong, I do like some animated projects and movies (most of them foreign and/or independent), but I cannot stand racist crap in media. I could go on and on about that issue.

        Like

  2. People surprised by this, have no clue (or don’t want to have one) about what happened (and happens) in “the land of the (not so) free and the home of the (not so) brave.”

    Here’s another hidden story: Cherokee people were forced in 1838 to stay in concentration camps due to asshole Jackson’s Indian Removal Act.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That’s so true. I did hear about the Indian Removal Act and Jackson was a total scumbag with how he treated the Natives. On a related, yet separate note. One person called for the extermination of Native Americans during the Wounded Knee Massacre and that was none other than L. Frank Baum. Yes, the same guy who created The Wizard of Oz said that. Seriously, look at his editorials about Wounded Knee, replace Indian with the word Jew and you would have propaganda straight out of the Third Reich. It’s atrocious with all the crimes these people have gotten away with and/or were cheerleaders for.

      Liked by 1 person

          1. It (sometimes) baffles (and oh yes, angers) me, that many self-proclaimed world healers, activists, revolutionaries, and other change promoters deeply concerned with all the shit they so deeply despise, often know so little about the history of humanity and/or what went on in their own backyard, and yet claiming to have the solutions for a better world right in their hands.

            Btw, you and Africa: Do you speak any of their languages? Shona? Zulu? Can come in handy when wanting to learn something about what really went on in, for instance, Zimbabwe.

            Like

Let your voice be heard, contribute to this discussion. What is your opinion?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.